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E36 M3 (1992-1999) {Euro - S50 B32 321hp @ 7400 rpm} {U.S. - S52 B32 240 hp @ 6000 rpm}
Total Produced: 71,212 - Years Produced: 1992 to 1999


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Old Wed, Jul-10-2019, 08:15:04 AM   #241
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Default Re: 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy)

I'm glad you reverted to your old cooler because that forced you to replace the coupling to the return line which absolutely would have started to seep in a few years and would have pissed you off. What you've ended up doing is a "must-do" mod. Having a removable coupling there also make draining and flushing the PS system a trivial and mess-free exercise, you decouple there and drain from the cooler (with some garden hose shoved onto the nipple).

The feed line (res -> pump) is not high pressure, the only high pressure line in the system is the pump -> rack line (which is why it's so expensive). Not important for your change but worth knowing nevertheless. The pump is gravity fed from the res.

Finally, did you save, or can you recover, you old return line (cooler -> res)? If so, grab it and cut the restrictor out of it, your new line doesn't have one. You may never need it but you can't get them as a spare/separate part so if you do need it you'll be glad you saved it. If you're planning track work or otherwise your PS fluid gets hot you'll need to install the restrictor (or have low PS fluid because it's all over your engine bay). To install the restrictor drain (and keep) your PS fluid (at your new cooler coupling), pop off the return line, drop the restrictor into that line and clamp it in place (approx. middle of hose) with a normal worm-drive clamp. Reinstall and reuse your fluid if it's still red. Profit.

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Last edited by M3AN; Thu, Jul-11-2019 at 08:06:08 AM.
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Old Wed, Jul-10-2019, 03:10:05 PM   #242
Texaz3
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Default Re: 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy)

Quote:
Originally Posted by nholmes View Post
I haven't been here in a while. It's pretty amazing how clean most of your engine is.

Thanks! Cleaned it a few times since I got the car. That is why I was so surprised when I saw dirt under the air intake.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bmwahba39 View Post
Man that's nice! Now that you've done all the lines, a ZHP rack upgrade would be fitting

Keep up the great work. The car looks excellent.
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Originally Posted by hammerfang View Post
wow awesome job
Thanks guys!

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Originally Posted by CheckABS View Post
When is the next cookout? I'll make sure to swing by!

Love Dakar M3s and I love that garage stable even more.
How is that LSB doing? If you ever decide to let it go again, let me know!

Quote:
Originally Posted by M3AN View Post
I'm glad you reverted to your old cooler because that forced you to replace the coupling to the return line which absolutely would have started to seep in a few years and would have pissed you off. What you've ended up doing is a "must-do" mod. Having a removable coupling there also make draining and flushing the PS system a trivial and mess-free exercise, you decouple there and drain from the cooler (with some garden hose shoved onto the nipple).
Well, I didn't not revert back YET, but will do at some point. I was too tired working in Texas heat to go back and re-do it. But since I have the part now...

Quote:
Originally Posted by M3AN View Post
The feed line (res -> pump) is not high pressure, the only high pressure line in the system is the pump -> rack line (which is why it's so expensive). Not important for your change but worth knowing nevertheless. The pump is gravity fed from the res.
Yes, I know - I mean that line from pump to rack - I did not replace that - it was completely dry. Just din't feel like messing with perfectly working part - a sure way to screw something up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by M3AN View Post
Finally, did your save, or can you recover, you old return line (cooler -> res)? If so, grab it and cut the restrictor out of it, your new line doesn't have one. You may never need it but you can't get them as a spare/separate part so if you do need it you'll be glad you saved it. If you're planning track work or otherwise your PS fluid gets hot you'll need to install the restrictor (or have low PS fluid because it's all over your engine bay). To install the restrictor drain (and keep) your PS fluid (at your new cooler coupling), pop off the return line, drop the restrictor into that line and clamp it in place (approx. middle of hose) with a normal worm-drive clamp. Reinstall and reuse your fluid if it's still red. Profit.

Now, this is news to me. I'm glad that I saw your message BEFORE I put my trash out this morning, cause I dived into my bin and recovered that old line - will remove the restrictor this evening - thanks!

I was wondering what that additional clamp in the middle of the line was for! How come new line does not come with it?
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Last edited by Texaz3; Wed, Jul-10-2019 at 06:40:56 PM.
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Old Thu, Jul-11-2019, 08:39:04 AM   #243
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Default Re: 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy)

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Originally Posted by Texaz3 View Post
Now, this is news to me. I'm glad that I saw your message BEFORE I put my trash out this morning, cause I dived into my bin and recovered that old line - will remove the restrictor this evening - thanks!

I was wondering what that additional clamp in the middle of the line was for! How come new line does not come with it?


Difficult to know why it's not included but it was over engineering for a street car and mostly unnecessary. It only serves a function when your PS fluid gets really hot.

I've never seen an aftermarket cooler with the restrictor and I have seen BMW coolers without the restrictor... not sure what the patterns are.
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Old Thu, Jul-11-2019, 03:50:42 PM   #244
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Default Re: 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy)

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Originally Posted by M3AN View Post


Difficult to know why it's not included but it was over engineering for a street car and mostly unnecessary. It only serves a function when your PS fluid gets really hot.

I've never seen an aftermarket cooler with the restrictor and I have seen BMW coolers without the restrictor... not sure what the patterns are.
Got the sucker out:
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Old Thu, Jul-11-2019, 05:45:27 PM   #245
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Default Re: 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy)

That panorama picture of all your cars is amazing. I'm itching for an M2C, but trying hard to not look too hard!

P.S. I took the E36 to work as well and keep loving how raw it feels to the newer cars out there.
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Old Thu, Jul-11-2019, 05:55:34 PM   #246
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Default Re: 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy)

Those hose clamps are going to fail eventually.

The center pull clamps are for sure the way to go and will look a lot better.
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Old Thu, Jul-11-2019, 06:19:28 PM   #247
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Default Re: 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy)

That is one impressive collection of M cars you have!
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Old Thu, Jul-11-2019, 06:29:21 PM   #248
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Default Re: 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy)

i would kill for this kind of space!! very nice.
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Old Wed, Sep-04-2019, 11:20:22 PM   #249
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Default Re: 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy)

Finally, an update on this puppy - and it’s a big one. Well, sort of – couple of things that I wanted to do for a long time and finally found the time to do.

Even though the headliner in my car was just fine when I bought it, Texas heat does wonderful things to 20-year old foam backing, and after a couple of summers, I regrettably saw this one day:

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Well, poop. Sucks but what are you going to do.

So I went online looking for a company that would ship me some original BMW headliner fabric, found Veteran Co via the forum, but their ordering system is a nightmare, plus they didn’t have it in stock, so I gave up.

Found some BM134 fabric at Euro Auto Interiors, and was able to order online. Came out a bit more than Veteran at $50 per yard, but the convenience of online ordering and the fact they had it in stock made up for it.

So I yanked the headliner out:

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Luckily my sunroof still looked fine, though not sure for how much longer, but we’ll cross that bridge then:

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Didn’t realize sunroof cassette was sooo huge!

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Removing headliner turned out to be not that big of a deal, and it slid out the door with seats laid flat quite easily. Lots of stuff to take off (and keep track of hardware), but not complicated:

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

As suspected, the foam completely gave, and the entire headliner was just peeling off easily:

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Even the spots around the visors shrunk and started bubbling:

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

But what can you expect from over 20-year old dachverkleidung? Ja, ja…

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Meanwhile, the fabric arrived, and it was time to get to work. Nice foam backed roll:

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

I’d say it was spot on texture and color wise (original headliner was probably sun bleached some):

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

I ordered 2 yards, and it was enough to do the headliner with some extra material remaining:

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

So, with all necessary supplies ready, me and a friend of mine tacked the job of re-upholstery. Most of the foam remained on the headliner board after fabric removal:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Removal of the foam sucks, as the dust flies everywhere, wear dust mask:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Does not take long with proper tools, but it’s a tedious job:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

All cleaned up:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Spraying the glue on the board:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner board covered in glue – drying:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Measure the fabric, cut to size, spray one side of the fabric with glue – let sit for 5 minutes:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Repeat for the other side:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

And then gently press the fabric into the board, carefully stretching it and wrapping all of the curves. The glue that I used is DAP contact cement, and it is completely dry to the touch, but instantly chemically bonds when two painted surfaces pressed together. Really cool stuff and wonderful to work with. Rated at 170F, so hopefully I won’t have to re-do this until the foam fails again in 20 years.

Once the fabric was glued to the board, I flipped it and started trimming the back side and cutting holes:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Doesn’t look pretty, but who cares:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Tada!

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Turned out real good:

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner 2 by Italian Horses, on Flickr

I purposely started early in the morning as it gets hot by 10am and it was getting hot by the time we were done. So I continued to work and put that sucker in:

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

You can still see some indentations from where I was pressing with my fingers on the foam while installing it in the pictures, since I took them right after putting it in. All straightened out after couple of hours in the heat! So overall, pretty happy to get that done and not worry about the headliner for some time.

But not all was good, as when I lowered the drivers’ seat to get the headliner in, I heard some unpleasant noise when reclining the back, and sure enough when headliner was in, I couldn’t put the seat back up. I heard the motor attempting to spin, but nothing. And it was fully reclined. Well, crap.

Pulled the seat up, took the motors off, and yanked the gearbox cover off:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Bah…what do we see here:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

A 20-year-old plastic gear broken into tiny plastic pieces! Nice!

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

4 pieces, actually:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Disappointed that my new headliner test-drive would have to wait, I pulled the gearbox off the seat:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Removed the worm shaft, unclipped c-clamp, removed and cleaned the bearings:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

To no ones surprise, BMW does not make or sell the gears by themselves. Duh! To no ones surprise again, Amazon had plenty in stock from at least 4 different Chinese manufacturers. Since it was already past noon, same day delivery was not an option, so I ordered a gear, and decided that drinking beer for the rest of the day was way more attractive proposition.

Two days later, the gear in an unmarked yellow envelope was delivered to my mailbox:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Looked a bit smaller than I thought, but the thread pitch seemed fine:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

The problem was that the shaft wouldn’t fit into the gear. Forum posts suggested hammering the shaft into the gear with some lube. Half way in, I honestly thought it was going to split:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

A little more…still not there though:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

And finally the sucker was on and secured by the clamp:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Re-installed the shaft into the gearbox:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Re-packed with grease:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Put the cover and service hole plug back on:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

In retrospect, I should not have removed the gearbox off the seat, as re-installation in the car with unsecured seat back flipping back and forth was a nightmare. So I took the seat out:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

What a f@cking nightmare…But finally it went back on and all assembled ready to go back into the car:

Untitled by Italian Horses, on Flickr

While the seat was out, I cleaned up the interior. Found 50 cents.

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Finally, the seat was back in and fully operational:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Time for a beer.

On a separate note, I got new wheels and tires for the car. Few months ago I picked up a neglected and beat up set of DS2 (style 39) wheels which I happen to like a lot, and had them re-finished along with a spare set of style 40 “Roadstars” for my M Coupe:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Waiting and looking at its new shoes:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

The wheels turned out fantastic:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Untitled by Italian Horses, on Flickr

After putting the new kicks on, took it for some gas:

Wheels gear by Italian Horses, on Flickr

Finally, a nice hand wash, and back into garage:

Headliner by Italian Horses, on Flickr

That’s it for today fellas. Will try to take some new “beauty” pictures sometime soon. Need to try out that new 200mm lens!

Cheers!
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Old Wed, Sep-04-2019, 11:41:42 PM   #250
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Default Re: 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy)

Great work! I also pulled out seats this weekend, but only found $0.33

Love the DS!
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Discussing 1999 Dakar M3 Coupe Build/Restoration Journal (Long and Picture Heavy) in the E36 M3 (1992-1999) Forum - {Euro - S50 B32 321hp @ 7400 rpm} {U.S. - S52 B32 240 hp @ 6000 rpm}
Total Produced: 71,212 - Years Produced: 1992 to 1999 at BMW M3 Forum.com (E30 M3 | E36 M3 | E46 M3 | E92 M3 | F80/X)