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M3 Track: Racing and DE Best mod for speed is learning to get the most out of what you currently have. Tracks and DE's is the place to start!


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Old Sun, Jul-29-2012, 02:54:07 PM   #11
930man
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Default Re: Rotor Design Question

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You don't think reducing spinning weight would reduce energy that has to be dissipated by the pad/rotors?
The percentage of reduced weight in the overall equation.... I doubt there would even be a measurable difference.. Then factor different breaking styles .. Tire compounds weight of vehicle .. Really unless you are selling them for a business I could not or would not say that the difference in weight from a stick rotor to a 2 pc rotor will increase your pad life because of weight savings...
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Old Sun, Jul-29-2012, 03:07:22 PM   #12
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Default Re: Rotor Design Question

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You don't think reducing spinning weight would reduce energy that has to be dissipated by the pad/rotors?
Huh? the energy is in the movement of the entire car. Youre converting the kinetic energy of the moving vehicle into heat. And the system is limited by your tires, not your rotors, not your pads, not your slots, and not your holes.
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Old Sun, Jul-29-2012, 03:40:40 PM   #13
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Default Re: Rotor Design Question

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Originally Posted by ThunderMoose View Post
You don't think reducing spinning weight would reduce energy that has to be dissipated by the pad/rotors?
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Originally Posted by magnetic1 View Post
Huh? the energy is in the movement of the entire car. Youre converting the kinetic energy of the moving vehicle into heat. And the system is limited by your tires, not your rotors, not your pads, not your slots, and not your holes.
Agreed....
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Old Sun, Jul-29-2012, 03:50:04 PM   #14
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Default Re: Rotor Design Question

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Originally Posted by 930man View Post
The percentage of reduced weight in the overall equation.... I doubt there would even be a measurable difference.. Then factor different breaking styles .. Tire compounds weight of vehicle .. Really unless you are selling them for a business I could not or would not say that the difference in weight from a stick rotor to a 2 pc rotor will increase your pad life because of weight savings...
I thought we were discussing small differences.

My point was simply that there is a gain, albeit small. Since the function of brakes is to convert kinetic energy into heat via friction AND the rotor does act as a form of flywheel (i.e. more mass = more stored rotational kinetic energy), then any reduction in rotor weight is going to help with braking.

In any event, I don't think we're really disagreeing with each other. I agree that most drivers, factoring in vehicle weight and braking styles, are not going to notice the difference between rotor weight or between blank, slotted, or drilled rotors. They certainly will notice the difference between brake pad materials and boiling brake fluid. These would be the first brake upgrades that I would recommend for someone starting to track.

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Discussing Rotor Design Question in the M3 Track: Racing and DE Forum - Best mod for speed is learning to get the most out of what you currently have. Tracks and DE's is the place to start! at BMW M3 Forum.com (E30 M3 | E36 M3 | E46 M3 | E92 M3 | F80/X)