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E36 M3 (1992-1999) {Euro - S50 B32 321hp @ 7400 rpm} {U.S. - S52 B32 240 hp @ 6000 rpm}
Total Produced: 71,212 - Years Produced: 1992 to 1999


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Old Wed, Oct-10-2018, 03:38:26 AM   #61
Contracheatcode
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Default Re: E36 M3 4-Door: Contracheatcode Build Journal

Quote:
Originally Posted by Braymond141 View Post
Recoating everything too?
Note sure. I'll wait until it's off to assess condition. Since it will be apart, I most likely will take the extra few days to clean and put a fresh spray of paint on. I mean why not? May as well, while it is apart. I assume any black enamel high-temp paint will do?

Also how do I change to default font of these posts to BLACK and not RED
?

Last edited by Contracheatcode; Wed, Oct-10-2018 at 03:43:21 AM.
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Old Wed, Oct-17-2018, 09:50:15 PM   #62
Contracheatcode
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Default Re: E36 M3 4-Door: Contracheatcode Build Journal


Captain's Log: The subframe is now dropped (see above DIY and my advice). Now it's time to create the DIY for the bushing removal and install.

DIY: E36 M3 1997 4-Door: Rear Bushing Refresh (Removal and Install)

Update: OMG. Finally. All the original bushings are now removed. While removing the subframe seemed daunting and in reality it was not too bad, the bushings seemed easy to remove and in reality they are much harder than you think.

The #1 Tip BY FAR: You will need the right tools for this job. They are not tools that most have laying around. If you have all the exact right tools, then the process to remove the bushings is easy. If you have some of the right tools and you need to "make" other tools work, then the process becomes a little harder. If you have none of the right tools, the process is exceptionally challenging. In the end I was somewhere in the middle. The below process worked well for me. It minimized my out-of-pocket spend, though required me to be somewhat creative.

The #2 Tip BY slightly less FAR: Understand the process and the mechanics of what is going on prior to doing anything.

I summarize the process of removing all the bushing / ball joints like this:
  • The bushings all sit in a very tight space and the amount of force required to push them out is tremendous. Sure go ahead any try hammering them out. Unless you are Thor and super accurate with a swing, you are going to damage the subframe and make no progress getting them out with a hammer.
  • To get the pushing out, you are going to need a tool that can push the bushing out from one side to the other side. A hydraulic press might be the easiest way to explain this. If you have a hydraulic press (I did not), you can place the part (example: Lower Control Arm) with bushing attached on the hydraulic press table, then pull the handle on the hydraulic press. With the right size "attachment" the press would push the bushing out of the underside. And done. Yay. If you performing this DIY and using this guide, I would guess you do not have a hydraulic press.
  • Without a hydraulic press, you are going to end up using a tool that utilizes the same concept as a RTAB tool. Basically the tool is comprised of 3 parts: 1) threaded rod (not your normal threaded rod), 2) Push part on one end of the threaded rod, and 3) Accept part on the other end of the threaded rod.
  • Let's talk about the Push part: To push the bushing out, you are going to need something cylindrical (think toilet paper roll if you do not know what cylindrical means) that is slight smaller than the diameter of the bushing you are pushing out. The cylindrical part will sit right on top of the bushing. Then something will push this cylindrical part against the bushing. It will push the bushing out and eventually slide all the way through the part holding the bushing. Since you do not want this cylindrical part to get stuck where the bushing used to be, it needs to be slightly SMALLER in diameter vs. the bushing. It also needs to be super strong as the force applied is a lot. In the DIY, you will see that I used steel exhaust cut-offs from O'Really Auto Parts.
  • Let's talk about the Accept part: On the other end of the threaded rod is a similar cylindrical part that is slightly LARGER than the bushing. It will sit on the "rim" of the part (example: Lower Control Arm) and allow the bushing to be pushed through it. Because the bushing is pushed through it, the length needs to be greater than the length of the bushing.
  • Let's Summarize: For every bushing you are going to need 2 things that are very dependent on each bushing size 1) a cylindrical part slightly SMALLER than the bushing diameter, and 2) a cylindrical part slightly LARGER than the bushing diameter.
  • The Tricky Part: Both parts need to be just the right size (and be strong). Why you ask? Think about each bushing. They all have a metal sleeve that encompasses the outside of the bushing. The "wall" or thickness of this sleeve is small. Inside this wall is rubber, followed by metal to accept the bolt. If you push upon the rubber or bolt hold the outer "wall" will not move. Yes, you got the rubber and bolt hole out, but the metal sleeve still remains and needs to come out. Some take a saw and cut the sleeve. This is an option, but there is a better way. Now think about the "Accept" part I mentioned above, it also has to be just the right size to sit on the "rim" of the part. All parts have to sit flush and perfectly straight.
  • SOOOOOOOO: Before you start to remove an old bushing, you are on a hunt for just the right size Push and Accept cylinders. Once you find this, removing a bushing is pretty easy (kinda).

The below DIY will guide you through each bushing. I will do my best to document the process and note any tips:

WORK IN PROGRESS..........





Last edited by Contracheatcode; Wed, Oct-17-2018 at 11:46:31 PM.
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Discussing E36 M3 4-Door: Contracheatcode Build Journal in the E36 M3 (1992-1999) Forum - {Euro - S50 B32 321hp @ 7400 rpm} {U.S. - S52 B32 240 hp @ 6000 rpm}
Total Produced: 71,212 - Years Produced: 1992 to 1999 at BMW M3 Forum.com (E30 M3 | E36 M3 | E46 M3 | E92 M3 | F80/X)