BMW M3 Forum
BMW M3 Forum BMW M3 Gallery BMW M3 Reviews BMW M3 Social Groups BMW M3 Chat M3Forum Sponsors >>
Loading


Mobile M3forum
Go Back   BMW M3 Forum.com (E30 M3 | E36 M3 | E46 M3 | E92 M3 | F80/X) > BMW M3 Discussions > E46 M3 (2001-2006)
Tire Rack Buy Winter Tires Now!
Not a member? Register Now!
Register Gallery All Albums Garage Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Calendar FAQ

E46 M3 (2001-2006) Engine: S54 - Max Hp: 333 hp at 7,900 rpm / 262 lb/ft at 4,900 rpm
Total Produced: 45,000+ - Years Produced: 2001 to 2006.


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old Thu, Feb-19-2015, 10:28:47 AM   #21
Obioban
Moderator
 
Obioban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 32,819
In the garage:
Reputation: 54 Obioban has a spectacular aura about
Location: SE PA

United States




Default Re: e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread

Total BMW - April 2006


Quote:








__________________

Current Cars: 2005 IR/IR M3, 2001 LMB/blk M5, Wife's 6mt NA RWD e91, 04 M3 wagon
Past cars: 04 M3, 96 M3, S50B32 e36 M3 CM race car

FS: 6mt, RWD, iDrive free, properly maintained e91 (wagon)
Jump to top Obioban is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Register now and remove these ads
Old Thu, Feb-19-2015, 10:32:18 AM   #22
Obioban
Moderator
 
Obioban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 32,819
In the garage:
Reputation: 54 Obioban has a spectacular aura about
Location: SE PA

United States




Default Re: e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread

World car fans test drive http://www.worldcarfans.com/10604287...rive-bmw-m3-cs

Quote:

A Legend’s Final Fanfare
Few cars feature on the “must own” list buried within the mildly pornographic corner of every car enthusiast’s mind. The E46 M3 will always feature near the top, however. This is the CS, the final edition before a more technology-laden version replaces this icon in 2007, and is one last chance to hail the outgoing icon with a fresh fanfare.
It is a CSL-lite, even in name, a hat doffed to the legendary, £60,000 Coupe Sport Lightweight that took the fight to the 911 back in 2002. The £2,400 option package over the price of a standard M3 buys CSL-look 19-inch wheels, bigger front brakes, a faster steering rack and a more advanced traction control system. Small changes perhaps, but they all add polish to the driving experience that was already blinding in the light.
This is a gilded M3 rather than a base-spec CSL, it’s a tribute act that won’t hit the resale value of the true standard bearer, but it does have a few big plus points. First it comes with real seats, rather than carbon-fibre racing numbers, it has all the sound insulation and it comes with a manual box whereas the full-bore CSL was only available with the SMG semi-automatic.
Now the SMG is faster and generally better in every way than making the change yourself, but then again it’s less fun. There’s something deeply satisfying about matching the change, the brake and the throttle on the way into a tightening bend. The CSL was a faster car, but in some ways this is the purer machine.
The 3.2-litre inline six engine won the Engine of the Year Award at the industry equivalent of the Oscars five years on the run, and takes what looks like a dolled up 3 Series to a higher plane.
With 343bhp and 269lb/ft of torque to play with, it was always going to be a gem. The straight six, selected because of its theoretical vibration free design and honed to perfection over many decades by BMW’s engineers, isn’t the biggest puller low down the rev range, but that provides everyday usability simply by keeping well away from the 8000 redline. Here the engine at least is refined and relatively unobtrusive.
Pushed beyond cruising revs, though, the exhausts crackle, the powerplant comes alive and the car hurtles down the road with real intent.
The 60mph mark falls by the wayside in 5.2s and its forward thrust is only reined in by the 155mph limiter. And the inline six’s song, a high-strung, high-revving metallic scream, is one of the most seductive sounds in motoring. Lots of engines have their own appeal, but a truly great one will encourage you to seek out back roads and stretch the tolerance of the law at every given opportunity just to drink in that noise.
And in a great car the stereo will prove only an annoying distraction, and not one CD came near this car in three days in my possession.
The quicker steering rack keys the car into the road that touch more than the stock M3, giving a confidence boost when it comes to drifting even with 1570kg to take care of. We’ve all seen the M3 driven properly at some point on track, arcing gracefully from one slide to the next, and this rack makes it that bit easier to control and retrieve the slide that much easier. Which makes you do more of them.
It’s hard to believe a car that can slot into the company car park can be so much fun on a winding road. You can cut through bends like a blade with the electronics on, or leave a trail of black lines through every bend. Crucially the Alcantara wheel provides infinite feedback on what’s happening at the rear before, during and after the moment that the lateral g-force finally pulls the car sideways.
Now the payoff is harder work in the car park and round town, and you can feel the M3’s sporting commitment through the seat as it bounces and jostles, but when you hit the right road such things pale into insignificance. And considering the performance on offer, the comfort level is more than good enough, outside of the 911 range there is no better compromise between performance and ride quality.
BMW prides itself on building perfectly balanced cars and relatively untroubled by the demand for creature comforts compared to the M5 and M6, this and the Z4M are the chief exponents of the art. And this is by far the prettiest.
Chris Bangle’s flame-surfaces have won over the masses and BMW’s range is currently one of the most exciting out there. Their performance cars are the best in their class, but this is one of the best looking cars to emerge from their gates. Like Hollywood nightclub bouncers this car exudes menace without resorting to the obvious violence of the current range and contains its latent aggression inside smooth curves and a relatively small frame.
The deep front spoiler, stretched wheel arches, tell-tale quad exhaust exit and side vents, transform a stylish and expensive, but ultimately ordinary sales rep chariot into a whole different animal – but there is nothing outrageous about the M3. It is a stylish reworking and is an elegant car, far more subtle than the 911 and a car that will always impress the cognoscenti.
A CSL would get more drooling groupies, but that was only ever a second car – a hugely expensive weekend toy.
This is a machine you could drive every day and so makes a great deal more sense. The CSL was almost too specialised a weapon, turning it into a full bore sportscar and making the four-seater daily driver aspect redundant. It’s the right balance for a car of this ilk, and at £43,555 it’s expensive enough to prove exclusive yet just within touch of mere mortals who can’t afford a second car.
Now the E46 M3 is guaranteed a place in the automotive Hall of Fame, and this, the rollout edition, is the most polished among them. If you have yet to experience the M3 and this car falls within the budget, you owe it to yourself to drive one.
__________________

Current Cars: 2005 IR/IR M3, 2001 LMB/blk M5, Wife's 6mt NA RWD e91, 04 M3 wagon
Past cars: 04 M3, 96 M3, S50B32 e36 M3 CM race car

FS: 6mt, RWD, iDrive free, properly maintained e91 (wagon)
Jump to top Obioban is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Thu, Feb-19-2015, 10:38:30 AM   #23
Obioban
Moderator
 
Obioban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 32,819
In the garage:
Reputation: 54 Obioban has a spectacular aura about
Location: SE PA

United States




Default Re: e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread

Pistonheads http://www.pistonheads.com/news/gene...et-watch/29948

Quote:
BMW M3 E46 (2000-2006): Market Watch
More focused than the E36 and better built, the screaming E46 is affordable too


With the E46 BMW sought to return the M3 to its more focused driving roots, but not at expense of quality - so this version is not only stiffer and quicker than the E36 but far more polished and comfortable too. So there's a real premium feel to the cabin, but a serious edge to the engine and styling too - witness the wide flared arches, bonnet bulge, gaping air intakes and four exhaust pipes.
CSL dropped weight, added powerCSL dropped weight, added powerThe E46's 3.2-litre six-cylinder motor produces 343hp at 7,900rpm, yet it's super flexible - clever double VANOS valve-timing enables the E46 to hit 62mph in just 5.2 seconds yet pull from 50mph to 75mph in a mere 5.4 seconds in fourth. BMW didn't produce an E46 M3 saloon though, sticking to coupe and convertible variants only - as with the original E30. Both six-speed manual and automated SMG transmissions were available.
2003 saw the release of the much lauded track-focused limited edition M3 CSL. By employing carbon fibre, plastics and thinner glass BMW shed 110kg of weight which - in conjunction with a power increase to 360hp - took the M3's 0-62mph time down to just 4.9 seconds. Sadly though, this was only available with the SMG transmission. The CSL was followed in 2005 by a less edgy M3 CS (Club Sport) model, before E46 production ended in 2006. BMW's UK sales figures show that over 2,500 E46 M3 Convertibles were sold, and nearly 3,000 M3 Coupes. As with the E36, values of the best examples look likely to rise over the next few years - although SMG versions may remain less popular. See here for a full PH buying guide.

Buy if: You're after the best all-round M3 deal - stick to a manual though
Don't buy if: You're looking for a future classic (CSL aside)
We found: 2004 BMW M3 manual, silver metallic, full BMW service history, 67K miles, £9,995

Price Guide
Poor: Under £6,495
Good: £6,500 to £11,995
A1: £12,000+
Special Editions: Club Sport £13,000 to £25,000, CSL £25,000+



__________________

Current Cars: 2005 IR/IR M3, 2001 LMB/blk M5, Wife's 6mt NA RWD e91, 04 M3 wagon
Past cars: 04 M3, 96 M3, S50B32 e36 M3 CM race car

FS: 6mt, RWD, iDrive free, properly maintained e91 (wagon)
Jump to top Obioban is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Thu, Feb-19-2015, 10:40:51 AM   #24
Obioban
Moderator
 
Obioban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 32,819
In the garage:
Reputation: 54 Obioban has a spectacular aura about
Location: SE PA

United States




Default Re: e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread

Pistonheads http://www.pistonheads.com/regulars/...-ph-blog/27849

Quote:
BMW M3 CSL: PH Blog
Why a 10-year wait to have a go with a CSL was well worth it for PH's man on the CSL anniversary tour


They say you should never meet your heroes, but for me the CSL is the exception to the rule. You see, when I was a tantalisingly close to being able to drive in 2003, I was lucky enough (or unlucky, depending on how you see it...) to have a CSL in the family. But I never got to drive it.
'Sean's' CSL hangs out with the others on the trip'Sean's' CSL hangs out with the others on the tripSo, after 10 years of waiting it was fitting to get the call to point BMW's finest example of the breed down to Munich for its special birthday bash.
To finally experience the sensory overload from behind the wheel - the pared-back carbon fibre clad cabin, the feedback from the chassis and the figure-hugging one-piece seat and Alcantara surfaces - was bracing and brought back memories etched into my mind.

I mentioned some reservations with the car in my CSL 10th anniversary diary and how today you have to view it as something of a classic, but setting my rose-tinted spectacles to one side, the CSL was still sublime; everything I'd hoped it would be.

In Sport mode the throttle response is so good it's as if the pedal's an extension of your right foot. And the engine's mapping is so smooth and of such high resolution that it never hesitates or stutters when you ask for the gas - even at low revs and in a high gear. Prodding the Sport button opens up a flap in the airbox to give you the full hit of noise, too. Apart from adding around 10hp from the ram air effect, it goes all Spinal Tap on you, turning everything up to 11. It's the defining characteristic of the car.

Stereo's rubbish, induction noise immenseStereo's rubbish, induction noise immenseIt starts out as a raucous, rude hammering from under the bonnet and morphs into a sound that buzzes around your brain like a swarm of kamikaze wasps. It begs for more, and more. And more. It's relentless.
I could feel the CSL itching to devour some corners on the autobahn on the way down - even if the straight-line blasts were good fun and better to listen to than the shockingly tinny stereo...

I had to wait a few days, but it duly delivered when the roads presented the opportunity. The steering feels so direct - it's quicker than the standard E46 M3's and combines with a beautifully balanced chassis that means you feel confident in pushing the car hard early on.

It's rewarding when you do, too. Grip is abundant, but not so strong that it'll ruin any fun. Stiffer and more focused than any normal M3, the point at which the CSL let's you know you're taking liberties is strongly defined, but it does warn you when you're getting close.

A 10-year wait for a drive but worth every secondA 10-year wait for a drive but worth every secondFrom every point of contact it bristles with information. The connection to the chassis is so strong through the wheel, the seat and the throttle that driving hard becomes the default mode and ridiculously intuitive.
I'm glad I met my hero.






__________________

Current Cars: 2005 IR/IR M3, 2001 LMB/blk M5, Wife's 6mt NA RWD e91, 04 M3 wagon
Past cars: 04 M3, 96 M3, S50B32 e36 M3 CM race car

FS: 6mt, RWD, iDrive free, properly maintained e91 (wagon)
Jump to top Obioban is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Thu, Feb-19-2015, 10:42:16 AM   #25
Obioban
Moderator
 
Obioban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 32,819
In the garage:
Reputation: 54 Obioban has a spectacular aura about
Location: SE PA

United States




Default Re: e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread

Piston Heads http://www.pistonheads.com/news/gene...anscript/27916

Quote:
M3 CSL development team: PH Meets (transcript)
The full transcript of our chat with Hans-Bruno Starke and Peter Schmidt of the original CSL development team

Are you a true M3 CSL geek? Then make a brew, relax in a comfy chair and enjoy the full transcript of our conversation with BMW's Hans-Bruno Starke (HBS in the transcript) and Peter Schmidt (PS). Starke's role as head of body and trim for BMW M and Schmidt's as chassis development engineer reflect their roles on the original CSL development programme, both carrying what they learned on the project a decade ago into their work on current and future M cars. Clearly, the CSL's influence remains strong, likewise their passion for the decade-old M3.
It's a very detailed chat, and a lengthy one too, but if you're really into your CSLs and M cars in general there are some fascinating revelations and geeky little facts contained. Go on, indulge yourself!

Click here to go back to the main article and abridged version.

When the decision was made to make a CSL variant of the E46 M3, what were the goals in terms of weight saving over that car? Did you have a specific percentage figure or was it just let’s make it as light as we can for so many euros?

HBS: “As light as we can. We can only make new components and parts that are going to be specifically designed for M. So the basic design requirements, the functional requirement that relates to the kind of parts that we want to do. We want to have a nice car, an optimal car for aerodynamics, and the function of the car needs to be perfectly designed for the M car.

“So it was all about reducing weight and making it lighter. We did have a figure in mind. We did have a target. We wanted it to go under eight minutes around the Nurburgring – that was the top target. So we had two options. You either increase performance, or you reduce weight. But you can also increase performance through the tyres.

“Now this is a mix of everything you see. We worked on the aero design, we worked on the chassis’ design, we designed a specific tyre combination and we also had the top performance of lightweight design – that’s what we realised with this car. We were able to design parts that had only been in the pipeline in BMW as pre-development. And now they came onto the road in that car and they used to be in the pipeline.”

So it was almost like a running, working prototype for certain technologies you were experimenting with?

HBS: “Yes, yes, it was. Like the carbon fibre roof – there had been pre-development projects from BMW before. Not here in M, but elsewhere in the BMW group, and this way we were using the concept of realising carbon fibre. So we were able to use already existing development in the group to realise this roof – it was there already. The development was in the group, you know.

“So with that we were able to realise and produce this roof as the first series component. Do you know it’s a small component of what we call the BMW i philosophy today, and that was the best use of the car, of the roof, and we rolled it out to various coupes afterwards: E92 M3 and M6, for example. So we rolled it out more times.”

So, you didn’t purposely design the carbon fibre parts on the CSL and think these are just going to be for the CSL? It was always with a view to expanding and putting that sort of technology on other M cars?

HBS: “Of course, there has always been a desire to do that, so after the project started we proposed these components and the first series use had the highest costs – that was the CSL. Then after developing the processes then of course you get competitive edges when it comes to price, so you can manage to stop the technology costing so much.”

So that’s why it was £60,000 when it came out…

HBS: “But the roof of the M3 today is very similar to the CSL – only in processes, as it’s a new design – but we used the same processes. It’s a roof, sure, but making this in small numbers meant it would cost a lot of money. This was the first industrial application for a carbon fibre roof and saved around 7kg from the overall weight, lowering the centre of gravity, too. We also used lightweight materials for bulky items and we were able to use both components for subsequent models.”

If you look at the car next to a standard E46 M3, you can tell the lightweight parts in terms of the front bumper and the roof – they’re immediately obvious – but where else was the car optimised over a normal E46 M3 to save that weight?

HBS: “The rear window is a thin pane of glass – that was another optimisation.”

And the boot floor?

HBS: “Standard M3.”

Some people believe that the boot floor of the CSL is made of cardboard and can’t hold any weight, though?

HBS: “No, no. That was a joke actually, you know. Did they think it was real? We do have a paper composite used as the bottom in the boot, we do have that, but that’s the only cardboard I know of.

“You don’t see the chassis’ optimisations either. That’s not visible.”

In terms of trim, what sort of weight did you strip out of the interior over a standard E46 M3?

HBS: “110kg as a total weight reduction. That’s in total. Only interior – I don’t know exactly…”

50kg?

HBS: “Yeah, around 50kg probably. We have 25kg in the seats, the door panels and centre console and back seats, so nearly 50kg.”

The wheels are much lighter than even the ones on the CS aren’t they? The CS had the same design but they weren’t quite as light?

PS: “Yes, its 2kg per wheel compared to the series production E46 M3 with 19-inch wheels.”

The chassis optimisations for weight obviously aren’t visible, but over a regular M3 of the time, where is the weight saved mechanically?

PS: “The lower control arms are in aluminium at the rear.”

And anything else that’s different to the normal M3?

PS: “Not for weight, but for position we used optimised the ball joints.”

And the geometry, is the geometry much more aggressive?

PS: “Yes, of course, so we increased camber and castor, too.”

Going back to the body and the trim, was carbon fibre always the material you were focusing on, or did you experiment with any other material to try and get that weight saving but maybe not at the same cost?

HBS: “Apart from the boot lid – that was an exception. That’s in sheet mould compound – the entire rear lid, inside and outside. It was more for aerodynamics. It wasn’t for the purposes of reducing weight only, it was rather for aerodynamics. Of course you don’t want to shift the balance of weight between the front and rear axle – that was one reason.”

So what’s the weight distribution? Is it 52:48, front to rear?

PS: “No, it’s 51:49. The standard M3 was 52:48. There’s no extra weight at the rear in the CSL, it’s just changing the distribution by reducing the weight at the front.”

HBS: “We can also talk about the bumper. From a series production developer like myself actually the front bumper is a racing car component. It’s a carbon fibre shell made in the autoclave. It doesn’t have the plastic or aluminium carrier structure of the standard M3’s bumper – it’s different. So we accepted the risks specifically for this car in terms of cost.”

How much, then? 4,000 euros?

HBS: [Laughs] “Yes… I asked my boss if he wanted to have it light or inexpensive. He said light…”

And the exhaust system – was that lighter than the standard car? Thinner walled?

PS: “I don’t know. I think so… The air intake is light, because it’s carbon.”

HBS: “I’m not sure…”

What about spring rates and dampers settings?

PS: “Yeah, this is also special, optimised for the CSL. Every part. I don’t have the right figures, but it’s higher spring rates and optimised damper settings.”

Presumably a stiffer anti-roll bar as well?

PS: “Yeah.”

Coming from the E36, there was the E36 M3, then the GT. You move to the E46 and the E46 CSL – why didn’t you think about a CSL for the E36, or even the E30? What was it about 2003 and this car that made you think it was the right time to produce a CSL? There hadn’t been one out for 30 years or so, so why was the time right?

HBS: “The previous model – the E36 M3 – was watched very closely internally by BMW. Every one looked at its sportiness. And it was the danger that the M3 became too sporty. With the E36 M3 we showed a rear wing as well, and it was decided not to go with it because it was the idea to be a bit more withdrawn politically. That was quite difficult back then. There was a challenge that M cars should function on the road very perfectly and also on the race track. So you have to decide.

“We were very careful with the E36 in that you could get an M3 and an M3 with a sports package. If you compare these two, there’s not much of a difference. We knew that the M3 customers would be sad, but that’s why we were so inspired with the E46 CSL. We could do things like make the wheel arches wider and the chassis more differentiated form the standard car, and then the carbon fibre parts were just another add on.”

Moving to where BMW is now, we’ve got the M4 coming soon, and also with the carbon fibre technology and the partnerships you’re entering into with the BMW i sub brand, do you think there could be crossovers with the lessons you’ll learn from carbon fibre production with the i cars fed back to M cars – especially given the fact that you’ve gone turbocharged to help lower emissions and trying to lower weight by using these lightweight materials?

HBS: “Definitely, absolutely. Not at once, not right away. Our bodies are made in sheet metal, whereas BMW i cars are made specifically in a factory designed for carbon fibre construction. And still they’re faced with a challenge.

“We called it ‘intelligent lightweight’ with the CSL and its carbon fibre parts, so we don’t have to re-invent the planet completely. Because we build our M Cars – M5 and M6 in Dingolfing and the M3 here in Munich – as assembly line cars, we would need to look what is available. So if we reinvent it completely, it will not be affordable.”

That’s true, but if you look at McLaren with its carbon fibre tub on the 12C, is there room in the BMW range in the future for an out-and-out carbon fibre chassis hypercar above the i8 – as that’s really to showcase the i sub brand?

HBS: “I’m not a member of the board unfortunately…”

But you’re not ruling it out…

HBS: “I’d love it. It’d be an engineer’s dream. I’d be the first one to raise my hand if they asked us to do it. But one other thing, you know a supercar, that’d be a completely new process.”

Surely the lessons you learn with carbon fibre as part of the i projects can be transferred to other areas?

HBS: “Yeah, absolutely, of course. So the roof of the CSL to project i, it can also be done vice-versa.”

So between chassis and body and trim, what are your favourite parts of the car? When you signed the car off, what were you most proud of, the best thing you’d achieved with the E46 CSL?

HBS: “I can’t pick one thing. You have to look at the whole thing, the entire piece of art. It all works together. I was allowed to drive it once on the Nurburgring and I will never forget it. That will stay with me forever. It’s the whole thing.”

PS: “At that time I think it was because the task for this car was to be faster than eight minutes on the Nordschleife, so the question was what is necessary to achieve that goal?”

HBS: “I think it’s one of the most emotional M cars of the past.”

If you can’t tell me what your one favourite part is between you, what’s the one thing you would do differently if you had the opportunity again. You’re an engineer, so there must be something you’d do differently…

HBS: [Laughs] “Well, we search for improvements in lightweight materials – that’s an on-going process, right. And we have a lightweight carrier for the instrument panel we developed for the car, and it’s been published in material papers. It was originally designed for current M3, but it didn’t work, because it was not mature enough for series production. Just as an example, there are other components that had potential, but there were no series production processes at the time which fell into the budget to make production and the car’s end price affordable. There is potential, but it has to be affordable for the customer at the end of the day.”

Why was there no manual option on the car? Why offer it with just the SMG gearbox?

PS: “Race car technology. So it’s paddleshift.”

It’s interesting to look at how far paddleshift gearboxes have come in 10 years – DCT on M3, M5 and M6. I don’t mind this gearbox as you get quite a lot involvement with it. You feel it and hear it as you change gear, but wasn’t there a case for a manual?

HBS: “Using two gearboxes means there would have been more effort involved if you had two versions.”

Did you think about adaptive dampers at the time, or did you consciously want to go for a fixed rate damper?

PS: “Yes, we didn’t think about adaptive. We wanted to keep it plain, less weight, as simple as possible.”

So you were prepared to have a few more compromises on the road to achieve that ultimate performance on the track?

PS: “Yes. As in a race car, we lowered the variety of situations it had to work in. It was a special task, it had to lap the Nurbrgring in under eight minutes and that was it.”

Does it ride any lower than a standard M3?

PS: “Yes – at the front, it’s 10mm lower than a standard M3. Only at the front.”

Did you think about under body aerodynamics in the development of the car at all?

HBS: “Yes, there’s a cladding under the front to smooth airflow, but that’s as far as we went.”

And how much ram air effect do you think you get – how much extra horsepower do you think the scoop into the airbox gives at speed?

PS: “I think it’s around 10hp in total as you have high pressure in the airbox like a sports bike. In this car you don’t even measure the air intake, you calculate the air coming in. So it was already to high resistance with too much air for the measurement unit, so they took the measurement unit out like an air restrictor.”

So you measure air pressure?

PS: “Yeah, air temperature and pressure. That’s how we calculate it. That’s why we needed a more powerful control unit, because they have to calculate more as this car has higher potential. So really big steps for the last few hp.”

If you deleted air conditioning and the stereo, how much extra weight would that save you?

HBS: “21kg for air conditioning, and for the radio, I’m not sure. It was a no cost option. But you don’t need the air conditioning in England, no…?”

No, we do – it helps stop the windows steaming up in the rain. And the strut brace, how much of an effect does that have?

PS: “It gives you much sharper turn-in, much more precision at the front over the normal car.”

You wanted to target eight minutes for the Nurburgring and you wanted extra performance, so you changed springs, dampers, lighter wheels, more power, lighter interior. Why did you not put more emphasis on changing the brake setup?

PS: “Well, there’s a bigger disc in the front – 345mm for the CSL and the normal car has a 325mm disc. And the tyres were only for the CSL. We had a similar tyre for the current M3, but not quite a extreme. For the CSL these were very extreme.”

What sort of lateral g can you pull on those?

PS: “I think 1.4 lateral g, measured by Sport Auto. The rear brakes are the same, like the standard series M3.”

The guys who track there cars regularly, a lot of them put AP Racing calipers and discs on the front, as the brakes are thought to be the weakest point and fade quite a bit.

PS: “This was a series production car though and we still needed that compromise, as although we wanted race track performance, we still needed it to be a road car. We have special pads available with a different compound if you want to choose them.”

So you didn’t consider Perspex or anything even lighter for the windows? You wanted to keep glass for refinement?

HBS: “Yes. We dared to do that only with the GTS.”

So why not call the GTS a CSL. What was the reasoning behind that?

HBS: “That’s a different concept anyway, the GTS. There were less cars – the quantity was less. It’s more extreme. There’s no rear bench, there are four-point belts, there’s a roll cage and we have certified seats registered for racing. That was the problem – the complaint that they had with the CSL. They said there were no six-point belts available, so we gave it to them with the GTS. It’s rather a collector’s car, a racer’s car, the GTS.

“The GTS is only 125 units. The CSL, we honestly didn’t know how many cars we were going to produce. We discussed that, but we didn’t want to set a limit. We ended up having 15 to 16 hundred.”

Do you know what the final production total was?

HBS: “In the museum we say 1,383 – that’s the official number. And a few more tucked away somewhere…”

There’s a big CSL following in the UK – I don’t know if the same thing happens in Germany, but they say the black ones are faster…

HBS: “The CSL drivers were here this morning from Great Britain but 95 per cent of them were silver grey…”

Yeah, in the UK the black ones are much rarer.

HBS: “Yeah, the UK was the single biggest market in the world for the CSL. 422 cars were sold to the UK. That’s very British…

“At the beginning we thought we would make the car more extreme as well. We discussed scrapping the rear bench seat completely to make it a two-seater car only and save more weight. We discussed that and the answer was we couldn’t. That would have saved us the job of having to develop the folding mechanism for the front one-piece bucket seat, but sales insisted on having a four-seater. They had to develop the carbon fibre centre console and the concept car of 2001 also had the rear seats. We discussed it with the GTS but for the CSL there was still some need for day-to-day usability, so it was an issue. It was all discussed though.”

The concept car had a carbon fibre cam cover, too, how come the road car didn’t get that? Was it because of cost?

PS: “Maybe…”

HBS: “Yes, I think because of cost. Because the interior trims were also designed in carbon fibre as well, originally. The dashboard in the concept was originally meant to be carbon, but we decided to go with regular materials for the interior of the series production car. But we did realise a lot of carbon fibre features from the concept car.”

Are the radio and the speakers more basic than in the normal M3?

PS: “No… they’re basic items from the normal car.”

It sounds very tinny…

PS, HBS: [Laughing]

When you’ve got that noise to listen to though, I guess it doesn’t matter.

PS: “Yeah, that’s the sound generator!”

HBS: “So it’s no problem without air conditioning or the radio – you know, you have your windows down to get the ventilation and you listen to the engine…”
__________________

Current Cars: 2005 IR/IR M3, 2001 LMB/blk M5, Wife's 6mt NA RWD e91, 04 M3 wagon
Past cars: 04 M3, 96 M3, S50B32 e36 M3 CM race car

FS: 6mt, RWD, iDrive free, properly maintained e91 (wagon)
Jump to top Obioban is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Thu, Feb-19-2015, 10:43:20 AM   #26
Obioban
Moderator
 
Obioban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 32,819
In the garage:
Reputation: 54 Obioban has a spectacular aura about
Location: SE PA

United States




Default Re: e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread

Pistonheads http://www.pistonheads.com/features/...ph-meets/27915

Quote:
CSL development team: PH Meets
PH talks carbon roofs, cardboard floors and more with the engineers who built the M3 CSL

Carbon fibre on road cars is commonplace now, but even 10 years ago it was an expensive, rarefied material reserved only for the top echelons of motorsport and ridiculous million pound hypercars. The E46 M3 CSL changed that.
Carbon's everywhere now but the CSL was a pioneerCarbon's everywhere now but the CSL was a pioneerFar from being a bolt-on special, BMW’s M Division engineers employed a considered analysis of using composite materials to turn the regular E46 M3 into the CSL, warranting the addition of that iconic boot badge. But what exactly was the motive behind the decision to make an M3 CSL back in 2003?
According to Hans-Bruno Starke – the engineer behind the CSL’s lightweight body and trim parts – “the time was right. The E36 M3 was watched very closely internally by BMW. Everyone looked at its sportiness and it was the danger that the car would become too sporty. The idea was to be more withdrawn politically, and we knew M3 owners would be sad at that. But things changed and that’s why we were so inspired when it came to the E46 CSL, we were allowed to differentiate it more from the standard car – make the wheel arches wider, the chassis more extreme and use carbon fibre parts.”

With the development team given the green light to make the M3 more hardcore, were there certain parameters the CSL had to hit? Yes, and Starke outlines the development goals thus.

BMW wanted the M3 less extreme ... oops!BMW wanted the M3 less extreme ... oops!“We just said ‘let’s make it as light as we can’. We wanted to have an optimal car in terms of aerodynamics and performance, but it still had to be functional on the road. We did have one target though – we wanted it to go round the Nurburgring in under eight minutes, so we had some options. You can either increase the performance, or you can reduce weight. But you can also increase the performance through the tyres, too.
“The CSL is a mix of everything. We worked on the aero and chassis design and designed a specific tyre combination. We also employed lightweight design – that’s what we realised with this car. We were able to design parts that had only been in the pipeline in BMW as pre-development items. They made the jump onto the road from the experimental stage.”

So the CSL was effectively a running, working prototype for future BMWs then?

Carbon on the body, and under it tooCarbon on the body, and under it tooStarke elaborates. “Yes, yes it was. Like the carbon fibre roof – there had been pre-development project from BMW before elsewhere in the group, and we utilised this existing development for the roof. With that we were able to realise the roof as the first series carbon component and roll it out onto later M cars. It’s a small part of what we call the BMW i philosophy today.”
Composite materials aren’t cheap now, let alone over a decade ago when the car was in development. BMW knew this, hence dipping its toe in the carbon fibre pool with the CSL before making the materials available on more standard M cars.

“There was always a desire to use it [carbon fibre] on other cars. After the project started we proposed these components and the first use had the highest costs – that was the CSL. But once you develop and refine the processes, you find competitive edges when it comes to price, so you can manage to stop the technology costing so much.”

You'll not be wanting to replace that bumper...You'll not be wanting to replace that bumper...So that’s why the CSL cost around £60,000 when it came out… But it truly was an innovative car in terms of its construction. No production vehicle built in similar numbers before it (officially 1,383 were made, with “a few more tucked away”, according to Starke) used the material as widely.
“The roof was the first industrial application of carbon fibre and saved around 7kg, lowering the centre of gravity, too. The front bumper is actually a racing car component. It’s a carbon fibre shell that doesn’t use the plastic or aluminium carrier structure of the standard M3. It costs around 4,000 euros.

“The rear window is a thinner pane of glass, but we kept that material to retain refinement. The total weight saving was 110kg [dropping the kerb weight to 1,385kg] and we must have taken around 50kg out of the interior – the door panels and centre console are carbon and the seats save around 25kg.” Looking at the original press pictures of the CSL [pictured] we can see just how lightweight it is.

Lighter wheels and stickier tyres part of the packageLighter wheels and stickier tyres part of the package“Actually, we discussed scrapping the rear bench seat completely to make it a two-seater and save more weight, but sales insisted on having a four-seater,” adds Starke.
And the infamous ‘cardboard’ boot floor?

“That was a joke. Did they think it was real? We do have a paper composite used at the bottom of the boot, but that’s the only cardboard I know of…”

The lightweight body and trim parts complimented the chassis. According to Peter Schmidt – the man behind the CSL’s chassis – the wheels are 2kg lighter than the 19-inch E46 M3 wheels, while the lower suspension control arms at the rear are in aluminium.

Without provocation Starke earlier touched on something with modern day relevance – the tie in with BMW’s i sub-brand and its carbon fibre constructed cars. The modern quest for ever more efficient vehicles is being achieved by downsized, forced induction motors and lightweight materials, so will lessons learnt from the CSL onwards and technology and processes from the i cars be utilised in future M products?

Evocative badge, still held dear by M engineersEvocative badge, still held dear by M engineers“Definitely. Absolutely. With the CSL we called the philosophy ‘intelligent lightweight’ [the same as BMW calls it today] so we don’t need to reinvent the planet completely. Just like the CSL’s roof, the process can be done vice-versa.” There’s great potential, then, that lightweight instrument carriers and carbon fibre panels could feature on a special version of the M4.
With the CSL, the lightweight engineering worked, and the M Division boffins achieved their goal. The car lapped the ’ring in 7min50sec. “It’s one of the most emotional M cars of the past,” believes Starke.
__________________

Current Cars: 2005 IR/IR M3, 2001 LMB/blk M5, Wife's 6mt NA RWD e91, 04 M3 wagon
Past cars: 04 M3, 96 M3, S50B32 e36 M3 CM race car

FS: 6mt, RWD, iDrive free, properly maintained e91 (wagon)
Jump to top Obioban is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Thu, Feb-19-2015, 10:44:38 AM   #27
Obioban
Moderator
 
Obioban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 32,819
In the garage:
Reputation: 54 Obioban has a spectacular aura about
Location: SE PA

United States




Default Re: e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread

The truth about cars http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2005/05/bmw-m3-cs/

Quote:
The M3 CS is one of those rare cars that makes you change your driving habits. Grasp its suede-effect steering wheel and you find yourself in a single-minded pursuit of corners. You hunt for wiggly arrow road signs like a lion searching for a wounded Wildebeest. You scan for curving off-ramps that lead to… curving on-ramps. You waggle to your destination as if you're trying to shake a bad guy. Sure, the 333hp M3 CS can obliterate a straight line. But it's a reverse scuba diver at heart. It lives for the bends.

The CS in question stands for "Competition Sport". It's the performance-enhanced version of the performance-enhanced version of BMW's venerable 3-Series. It's also the last hurrah of the current M3 before the new model, based on the latest generation 3-Series, inspires fresh reverence and awe. To pump-up the volume on the M3's Swan Song, the CS option package adds 19" wheels and tires, dramatically bigger brakes, a faster steering ratio (14.5:1), a less intrusive handling Nanny, aluminum interior trim and optional Interlagos Blue paint. Oh, and $4000.

Forged wheels, 19' tires and enlarged brakes make a sharp-handling car into a four-wheeled scalpel. Unlike its Euro-spec counterpart, the M3 CSL, the CS is not a stripped-down, lightweight flyer. It's a full-fat M3 with a bit more grip. Make that a lot more grip. OK, a double-helping of grip, with a side order of grip, and a large grip cola. Not to mention the extra control that comes from the significantly sharper steering and the enhanced security provided by the car's seriously savage stoppers. All of which puts us back where we started: attacking a sharp corner at speeds that would, seemingly, make a recovery driver's day.

But no, the M3 CS dispatches tight turns with so much flat-bodied, sure-footed poise that cornering quickly becomes more addictive than iced coffee in August. If you're brave enough to write your name in rubber on the outside of the envelope, you can switch into Sport mode, switch off Dynamic Stability Control and put your faith in The Gods of Opposite Lock. At that point, the CS offers even more easily-adjusted tail-out action than a "normal" driftastic M3. The uber-uber-3 is more of a four-wheeled scalpel than a German sports sedan. It offers lateral-G jockeys the kind of finely-honed handling capabilities normally reserved for race-prepared vehicles. And that's where I've got issues.

Profile of a motorized miscreant, just itching for trouble.The car's name, "Competition Sport", is an open invitation to flog your M3 at a purpose-built race track. In case you missed the point, BMW's website spells it out: "For those looking to get even more track-oriented performance out of the legendary M3, we offer the Competition Package." Here's the problem: take your "track-oriented" M3 CS onto an actual race track for anything resembling a 'competitive event' and BMW could void your warranty. And don't think you can cheat. The M3 CS' black box records the time, date and shift points during all your high-speed sorties.

That sucks. The M3 CS' genetic propensity for a closed course– and antipathy towards real world slogging– is obvious from the moment you set off. The brakes are fade-free, but they bite like an amphetamine-crazed rattler. The steering is perfect for mid-corner corrections, but the car changes direction if you even THINK left or right. The suspension is ideal for well-groomed private tarmac, but the chassis jostles when driving over a gum wrapper. The wheels and tires offer more hold than a case of hair spray, but curbing those forged twin-spokes is easier than, um, not curbing them.

Same 333hp sweet-spinning, hi-revving six as before-- and there ain't nothing wrong with that. In fact, driving the BMW M3 CS at slow speeds is a lot more challenging than you'd imagine. Even if you discount the tightness of our box-fresh test car's six-speed gearbox (1800 miles on the clock), getting all the mechanical elements to work together harmoniously requires no small amount of concentration, and a light touch. In that sense, the CS is a true driver's car. Unlike the "base" M3 (or any current model Porsche), smooth piloting requires large amounts skill, planning and practice. Auto-pilot is not an option.

As you might imagine, give the M3 CS a proper pasting and it all makes perfect sense. But that still begs the question: where? If the race track is verboten, where can you drive a CS fast enough to fully exploit its astounding capabilities? For pistonheads, the obvious answer is "anywhere you can"– unless, of course, a member of law enforcement is asking the question. Driving an M3 CS on a public road is a direct challenge to any sense of self-restraint and, thus, your right to drive.

Where's the CS trunk badge?In the final analysis, the BMW M3 CS is the right car for the wrong world: a track day tool that's a bit too highly strung for the daily grind. That said, there are plenty of pistonheads who'll put up with anything for a moment or two of cornering perfection. And there will come a time when the Bimmer's warranty expires. CS owners live for that day.
__________________

Current Cars: 2005 IR/IR M3, 2001 LMB/blk M5, Wife's 6mt NA RWD e91, 04 M3 wagon
Past cars: 04 M3, 96 M3, S50B32 e36 M3 CM race car

FS: 6mt, RWD, iDrive free, properly maintained e91 (wagon)
Jump to top Obioban is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Thu, Feb-19-2015, 10:45:45 AM   #28
Obioban
Moderator
 
Obioban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 32,819
In the garage:
Reputation: 54 Obioban has a spectacular aura about
Location: SE PA

United States




Default Re: e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread

classicdriver.com http://www.classicdriver.com/en/arti...mw-m3-cs-coupé

Quote:
The new BMW M3 CS Coupé

BMW is set to enrich its M car line-up with the launch of the M3 CS. Based on the multi-award winning M3 Coupé, the M3 CS, available to order now in the UK, adds key performance ingredients from 2003’s exclusive M3 CSL. The result? An even more focused M3. And, at £43,555 on-the-road (a price premium of just £2,400 more than a BMW M3 Coupé), the CS will appeal to those M3 customers looking for that extra sparkle without compromising the exclusivity of M3 CSL ownership.

The M3 CS Coupé features performance-oriented CSL specification. It adds that car’s 18-inch disc brakes, a more direct steering rack (14.5 ratio rather than the 15.4 of the M3) and M Track Mode, the steering wheel activated system that increases DSC thresholds.
Styling additions will also set the car apart from a ‘standard’ M3. These include, ‘M3 CSL Design’ 19-inch light alloy wheels, steering wheel, hand brake lever and (optional) SMG gearstick clothed in Alcantara, exclusive ‘Alu Tec’ interior trim, and exclusive ‘Interlagos Blue’ paintwork (all M3 exterior colours are available).
All other technical and equipment specifications are as per the ‘standard’ M3 and the M3 CS is not being introduced as a limited edition. Whilst the M3 CS adds new desirability to an ‘old’ favourite, the new boys on the block, the M5 and M6, continue to make the news.
UK price announced for BMW M6
Fresh from its first international press drives, an on-the-road price of £79,760 has been confirmed for the 507bhp M6. This pitches the fastest ever BMW production car firmly against the similarly priced, but slower and less powerful Aston Martin V8 Vantage. It also makes a strong case against Italian supercars, with performance to challenge, for example, the 575M Maranello and 612 Scaglietti from Ferrari at considerably less expense.
__________________

Current Cars: 2005 IR/IR M3, 2001 LMB/blk M5, Wife's 6mt NA RWD e91, 04 M3 wagon
Past cars: 04 M3, 96 M3, S50B32 e36 M3 CM race car

FS: 6mt, RWD, iDrive free, properly maintained e91 (wagon)
Jump to top Obioban is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Thu, Feb-19-2015, 10:46:24 AM   #29
Obioban
Moderator
 
Obioban's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 32,819
In the garage:
Reputation: 54 Obioban has a spectacular aura about
Location: SE PA

United States




Default Re: e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread

Fifth gear B7 RS4 vs e46 M3

__________________

Current Cars: 2005 IR/IR M3, 2001 LMB/blk M5, Wife's 6mt NA RWD e91, 04 M3 wagon
Past cars: 04 M3, 96 M3, S50B32 e36 M3 CM race car

FS: 6mt, RWD, iDrive free, properly maintained e91 (wagon)
Jump to top Obioban is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Thu, Feb-19-2015, 03:40:37 PM   #30
M3Dom
Registered User
 
M3Dom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Age: 99
Posts: 35,155
In the garage:
Reputation: 0 M3Dom is on a distinguished road
Location: new york

United States




Default Re: e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread

http://www.caranddriver.com/features...3-buyers-guide
buying a used e46 C&D

Quote:



U.S. Availability: 2001–06 model years

Market Value: High-mileage runner: $13,000. Daily driver: $18,000. Garage queen: $25,000.

Why You Want an E46: The E46 M3 combined many of the best qualities of the two M3s that came before it, effectively silencing any complaints that BMW’s M division had grown complacent. Unlike the E36 it replaced, the E46 M3 was carefully differentiated from its lesser brethren. Mechanically, this meant that countless suspension and body components—everything from control arms and subframes to damper anchor points—were strengthened, stiffened, or relocated in the search for speed and durability.

Cosmetically, the E46 paid homage to the E30 with special fender flares front and rear, and its fender vents were meant to recall the 3.0CSL of the 1970s. (Little did BMW know they would become a popular glue-on accessory for every pimped ride—and then factory-produced models—during the next few years.)

Under the E46’s domed aluminum hood, BMW again installed a 3.2-liter inline-six, this version being an evolution of the more expensive engine that powered European E36s. It spat out 333 hp and a coarse metallic rasp, leaping for its 7900-rpm redline like a machine possessed. This should be more than enough to satisfy enthusiasts who are concerned about the E46’s 3450-pound curb weight.

Choosing Which One: Like the E36, the E46 M3 was offered in a wide variety of colors and with numerous options. The sedan configuration, however, was dropped for the E46, and coupes are more common—and desirable—as the convertibles pair a too-stiff suspension with a scuttle-shake-prone chassis.

Model-year changes were minimal, the most significant being the introduction of BMW’s six-speed sequential manual gearbox (SMG), an electronically shifted version of the M3’s standard six-speed manual. U.S. buyers were turned off by its punishing shifts and lack of involvement, so traditional sticks are more common in the E46 M3s here.

Although Americans couldn’t buy the lightweight CSL model introduced to Europe in 2003, select CSL parts were later found in the 2004–06 Competition Package variant that offered a quicker steering rack; unique wheels and trim; and larger, cross-drilled brakes. Cars so equipped are the most difficult to come by; happily, you can easily build one by cracking open your checkbook and a factory parts catalog.

This was the first M3 offered with factory navigation, and cars so equipped tend to be worth slightly less on the used market, but that varies with location and overall condition. BMW’s certified pre-owned lots and the enthusiast classifieds are generally the best places to look.

Watch Out For: The E46 is a fairly stout car, and it offers a beguiling combination of straight-line speed and modern polish. Durability, Thongsai says, is less of an issue than it is for the E36, and he notes that the E46 tends to cope better with hard use—everything from suspension-bushing life to interior wear is improved—than its predecessor. “The cooling systems are usually a bit longer-lived,” he says, “and the thermostat is set to run a little cooler than it does on the E36, which may help. By and large, when driven sensibly, they seem to hold up.”

Other issues: Early cars suffered from rod-bearing issues that were dealt with by a factory recall, so check with your local dealer to make sure this has been done to any car you might be considering. SMG-equipped examples often suffer from hydraulic-pump failure; the pump costs several thousand dollars. (As of this writing, a replacement clutch slave cylinder is nearly 1000 bucks.) As with the E30, valve adjustment is required every 30,000 miles.
__________________

Porshapwr:I thought every day was steak and BJ day?
Ghost : "She'll prolly suck your balls so hard they'll hatch"
Ben Z.;The Ultimate Driving Simulation Machine
LALaw :OP has been surprised by everything that's happened since the 13th Amendment
Cars : some verts


Last edited by M3Dom; Thu, Feb-19-2015 at 03:43:42 PM.
Jump to top M3Dom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT. The time now is 04:55:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
M3Forum.com and M3forum.net is in no way sponsored, endorsed or affiliated by or with BMW NA / BMW AG or any of it's subsidiaries or vendors.
BMW and M3 (E90 M3 | E92 M3 | E93 M3 | E46 M3 | E36 M3 | E30 M3) are registered trademarks of BMW AG.
M3Forum Terms of Service
Copyright ©1999-2014 M3Forum.com
Discussing e46 M3 Press/Media/Reviews/Articles Thread in the E46 M3 (2001-2006) Forum - Engine: S54 - Max Hp: 333 hp at 7,900 rpm / 262 lb/ft at 4,900 rpm
Total Produced: 45,000+ - Years Produced: 2001 to 2006. at BMW M3 Forum.com (E30 M3 | E36 M3 | E46 M3 | E92 M3 | F80/X)