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E46 M3 (2001-2006) Engine: S54 - Max Hp: 333 hp at 7,900 rpm / 262 lb/ft at 4,900 rpm
Total Produced: 45,000+ - Years Produced: 2001 to 2006.


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Old Sun, Oct-30-2016, 01:45:44 AM   #1
bimmerfan08
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Default DIY: E46 M3 S54 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment

This DIY is for the most part straightforward but time consuming. Attention to detail is a must however. My version of this DIY is a bit longer than those who have made DIYs before me as I elected to replace front suspension components along the way. I also wanted to give myself ample room during the process. I did this DIY solo and on jack stands to showcase that it can be done by the average DIYer by his/herself. More than two hands is always helpful but not necessary. This can be done in a weekend provided you have all of the right tools and parts. The spark plugs are removed to allow full travel and prevent damage of the pistons when relocating upward to access the rod bearings. Regarding the rod bearings themselves I chose to use WPC treated rod bearings sourced through a forum group buy.

Tools needed:

3/8" drive ratchet
1/2" drive ratchet
3/8" drive breaker bar
3/8" various socket extensions
3/8" drive torque wrench (5-90 ft-lbs needed)
Angle torque gauge - BMW has one they sell (PN: 90886009120) but you can use a generic angle torque gauge
8mm hex socket
9mm hex socket
10mm hex socket
10mm deep well hex socket
13mm hex socket
13mm deep well hex socket
14mm hex socket
16mm hex socket
17mm hex socket
19mm hex socket
5/8" deep well hex socket (16mm deep well hex socket can also be used)
4mm hex bit socket
5mm hex bit socket
6mm hex bit socket
8mm hex bit socket
T25 torx bit socket
T30 torx bit socket
E10 external torx socket
E11 external torx socket
E12 external torx socket (for M10 rod bolts)
12mm, 12 point socket (for M11 rod bolts)
Straight head screwdriver
10mm open end wrench
16mm open end wrench
18mm open end or ratchet wrench
Telescopic magnet stick
32mm open end fan wrench
Fan clutch tool
32mm hex socket or BMW crankshaft torx socket (PN: 83300491056) or 36mm 12-point socket
Needle nose pliers
Dead blow hammer
Gasket scraper
2 x jack or lift
2 x jack stands minimum or lift
Flashlights
Shop light

Optional tools depending on removal/replacement of front control arms, tie rods, and oil return hose:

17mm deep well hex socket
19mm deep well hex socket
21mm hex socket
19mm open end wrench
20mm open end wrench
21mm open end wrench
24mm open end wrench
1/2" drive sockets (mm)
1/2" drive breaker bar
1/2" drive torque wrench (for higher torque values)
3/8" or 1/2" drive impact wrench
Air compressor
Angle grinder or saw (to remove seized tie rods)
Angle grinder cutting disk
Ball joint separator
Jaw pincers or ear-type clamp pliers
Tie rod tool

Parts and supplies needed:

6 x red rod bearings (PN: 11247835439)
6 x blue rod bearings (PN: 11247835440)
1 x oil pan cover gasket. If built date is before 04/2003 (PN: 11137832023) and for build date after 04/2003 (PN: 11137834886) - the oil return pipe will have a lower steel braided section if your M3 has a newer oil pan
1 x oil dipstick o-ring (PN: 11431707164)
1 x engine oil filter (PN: 11427833769)
7 x liters of 10W-60 oil or oil of choice (PN: 79191225356)
12 x M10 connecting rod bolts for later S54s with build dates after 12/12/2002 (PN: 11247834310) - early S54s reuse M11 connecting rod bolts
12 x reinforcement plate hex bolts (PN: 31106772199)
4 x front control arm bracket hex bolts (PN: 33306760652)
1 x oil pan gasket (PN: 11131437237)
1 x torx bolt for steering shaft coupler (PN: 32306778609)
2 x power steering hose gasket ring (PN: 32411093596)
4 x power steering hose gasket ring (PN: 32411093597)
1 x tube of blue Loctite
1 x tube of red Loctite
1 liter of ATF (you may need more depending on how much power steering fluid gets drained)
Brake parts cleaner
Assembly lube
High temp gasket sealer - I used Victor Reinz Reinzosil
Anti-seize
PB Blaster
Piece of corrugated board
Latex/rubber gloves
Safety glasses or goggles
Small plastic bags to contain hardware or paper/corrugated and pen to lay out hardware
E46 3 series Bentley manual for reference

Optional parts depending on mileage and wear - these are covered and replaced in the DIY:

2 x motor mounts (PN: 11812283798)
4 x motor mount flange nuts (PN: 22116779973)
1 x steering shaft coupler (PN: 32301094703)
1 x right front control arm (PN: 31122229454) - comes with new lock nuts
1 x left front control arm (PN: 31122229453) - comes with new lock nuts
1 x right assembled tie rod (PN: 32112228786) - comes with new lock nut
1 x left assembled tie rod (PN: 32112228785) - comes with new lock nut
2 x front control arm bushings (PN: 31122229857) or aftermarket bushings - I chose BW TrackCAB delrin bushings
1 x additional torx bolt for steering shaft coupler (PN: 32306778609)
2 x tie rod boots (PN: 32131096910)
3 x copper crush gasket rings (PN: 07119963129)
1 x updated OE oil return line (PN: 11157832781) or modified original oil return line if you plan to update your oil return line
1 x AN to Metric adapter fitting (-6 AN to 12mm x 1.5) for the oil pan if you plan to update your oil return line
1 x oil level sensor (PN: 12617508003)

Notes/additional information:

Now is also a good time to order and replace any parts that require the various sections of the engine bay in this DIY to be disassembled. Parts such as the oil pump, fan clutch, pulleys, power steering rack, end links, serpentine belt, front struts/coilovers, sway bar, sway bar bushings, power steering pump, power steering rubber hoses, headers, coolant flush, CDV removal, front subframe reinforcement, transmission fluid change, valve adjustment, engine air filter, cabin air filter, and Xenon level sensor.

Link to BMW service bulletin B 11 04 04 for rod bearing replacement.

http://www.siwilson.com/BMW/Service_...20Bulletin.pdf

SYT_Shadow put together a great rod bearing replacement DIY that can be referenced below. My intent is to build upon his DIY by providing additional details such as exact tools used, tips, and any other information that lends itself helpful.

http://www.m3forum.net/m3forum/showthread.php?t=455681

And if you're Kaiv, you have a superb ability to perform this DIY in only 41 seconds.


Flow did an awesome job compiling many of the torque specs for the E46 M3. A link to download the PDF is below. Highly recommended in conjunction with the Bentley manual.


http://d.pr/f/1jtRu

Before performing this DIY, ensure you have all necessary parts, supplies, and tools.















This is how I went about organizing parts and hardware during this DIY.



Step 1: Working from top of engine bay, remove the intake duct by locating the 4 plastic expansion rivets. Here I used needle nose pliers to pull up on the center pins. Place the 4 rivets in a plastic bag. I've marked them in red to show their location.



The air intake duct removed.





Step 2: Remove the air intake duct elbow that slides into the front of the air filter box. It simply lifts up and out.



Step 3: Unplug MAF sensor connection. It is located just behind the air filter box on the air duct. Simply push the clips in and pull out.



Step 4: Release the 2 metal air box clips near the bottom of the air box.



Step 5: Loosen clamp around the air duct leading into the air box by inserting straight head screwdriver. There are 2 clamps on this air duct. 1 is located around the air box entrance itself and the other clamp is located right behind the MAF sensor location. You can loosen either but I chose the air box clamp. Once the clamp has been loosened, simply pull the air duct off and lift the entire air filter box assembly up and out of the car. I have circled the 2 clamps in red.



Space left after air filter box top and duct have been removed.



Step 6: Locate the Xenon ballast igniter box and unplug the two sensor wires feeding into the top of it. These are again simply clip and pull up. The one wire has a rubber boot that needs to be pulled back to expose clip. I have marked the locations with red circles.



Step 7: Pull up on the black plastic cover for the Xenon ballast igniter box. It doesn't take much force. Set aside and note location of the 3 retaining bolts.



Step 8: Using a 10mm hex socket, remove the 3 retaining bolts for the Xenon ballast igniter box. You will also need a 3/8" ratchet extension here attached to the ratchet to clear the igniter box while swiveling the ratchet.

Step 9: Once the 10mm bolts have been removed, set the Xenon ballast igniter box to the side somewhere. Be careful not to over extend the length the wires can travel. Now simply pull up on the lower portion of the air filter box and remove.



The lower air filter box section.



Step 10: Remove the plastic expansion rivet on top of the engine shroud. Again I used needle nosed pliers to pull the center pin up. The rivet is circled in red.



Step 11: Locate the plastic expansion rivet for the left (if youre facing engine bay) engine shroud piece. It is directly in front of the upper timing chain area. I've circled the rivet in red.



Step 12: With plastic expansion rivet removed, pull up and out on the left engine shroud piece. It doesn't take much effort, so go easy.



Step 13: Working from the passenger side of the engine (if facing it) locate the plastic expansion rivet for the right side engine shroud. It is right beneath the upper radiator coolant hose that comes off the radiator. Leave this engine shroud loose for now as the hose has to be disconnected to remove it completely.

Step 14: While on the right side of the engine, locate and remove the upper fan shroud retaining bolt. It uses a T25 torx driver bit socket. I've circled the location in red. Also notice the right engine shroud piece hanging loosely on the upper radiator hose in the background. This is okay.



Step 15: Locate and remove the lower fan shroud retaining bolt on the right side of the engine. It is directly below the upper retaining bolt. T he area gets a little tight but it is still accessible. I've circled the bolt in red and again this is a T25 torx driver bit socket.



Step 16: Working from the left side of engine if facing it, locate and unclip the sensor connection on top of the radiator. Like all BMW sensors, it simply unclips and pulls out. Tuck away to the left side near the secondary air pump area. I've circled the clip in red.



Step 17: While looking at top of radiator, locate the upper fan shroud retaining bolt for the left side if facing the engine. This bolt should be a few inches down and to the left of the sensor connection that was unclipped in step 24. The head is again a T25 torx driver bit socket. I've circled the location in red.



Step 18: Unclip the connection that sits in the left fan shroud support. It is gray in color and has large clips. Remove top portion of connection and set aside to the left. Remove the lower portion by pulling up and to then towards the engine. Set this portion to the left side as well near the secondary air pump.



Step 19: Locate and remove the last fan shroud retaining bolt. It it is easier to remove this bolt from under the car. It is directly below the lower radiator hose. Again, the head uses a T25 torx bit drive socket. I've circled the location in red.



Remember to bag those retaining bolts.



Step 20: Here comes the tricky part. Place your 32mm wrench around the fan nut. Next, place the fan tool around 2 of the bolt heads on the water pump pulley. The water pump pulley bolts are in a rectangular pattern, not square, so you may need to adjust the end of the fan tool you're using. The fan nut is reverse threaded, so to loosen it, you need to twist to the right. With the fan tool in your left hand and the 32mm wrench in your right hand, pull in opposite directions, i.e. outward. Make sure the 32mm wrench is being pulled to your right. It will take some force, but the fan nut should come lose. The fan nut is circled in red.



Step 21: Remove the fan and fan shroud by pulling up and out. The shroud needs to be completely loose for this step, so make sure it is pulled up first. Unthread the remainder of the fan nut if you haven't already done so. Be careful to not let the fan fall off the end of the water pump threads. Hold fan in one hand and spin to the right with the other. Pull fan up with the fan shroud together. You may be able to wedge the fan out first once half of the fan shroud is above the engine. Again be careful here. Set the fan and fan shroud aside in a location where they wont get damaged. The oil cooler can be relocated on the bottom and moved so that the fan can be taken out from the bottom but I chose to remove it from the top.



You now have the clear working space you need to continue.



Step 22: If your M3 has a strut tower brace, you'll need to remove the middle section of the brace first before continuing. Unclip the plastic wire harness above the engine that's connected to the front of the microfilter. There are 4 clips on this harness. Simply, but gently pry apart the plastic ears. Set the black harness cover to the side. Allow the positive terminal cable and black PVC cable to fall out of clips from inside the harness. You may have to gently pull down on them to remove them. I've circled the 4 clips in red.





Step 23: Locate the microfilter towards the back of the engine bay and directly above the engine itself. There are 3 retaining clips that are spring-loaded holding the top of the microfilter cover closed. Simply twist 90 degrees to relieve the tension on the spring and push the clips upward. Leave the clips in the cover itself. Remove the cover by pulling up and out. I've circled their locations in red.



The clips in their "open" position after they have been twisted.



Step 24: The microfilter is now exposed. Remove it by simply pulling up and out. The two faces of the microfilter are different because of the orientation that they sit within the microfilter housing, but I went ahead and marked the bottom side to note the clean side of the filter.



Step 25: Locate the 4 screws that hold the microfilter housing to the car body. After removing the microfilter, they are quite present. These have T30 hex drive bit heads so take out your wrench and extension if you need one, and slip the drive bit on. Unscrew all 4 screws and bag them. I've circled their locations in red.





Bag those screws. This will help prevent loss of valuable and much needed bolts, screws, nuts, etc. It also allows for better organization and will prevent mixing of parts.



Step 26: If you have angel eyes and have hidden the angel eye power wire underneath the rubber seal around the microfilter housing, you'll need to remove it. Simply lift up on the rubber seal and pull the wire out. For those that don't have angel eyes, you can skip this step.



Place all your parts that have been removed off to the side and in a neat location.



Step 27: Push angel eye power wire up and out of the way. I simply placed mine up and over the cowl to keep it off the engine.



Step 28: Locate and remove the vent tube on top of the engine. It spans from the engine cover over to the intake cover. There are small release clips around the base of each inlet on the hose. Squeeze these tight (you'll notice the grip locations for your fingers) and pull up on the hose. I've circled the grips in red. Set aside for now (you can replace it after the engine cover has been removed).



The vent hose removed and the grips circled in red.



Step 29: As a safety precaution when working with anything electrical, I went ahead and disconnected the negative terminal cable from the battery. The battery is located in the truck to the right. Lift up on the trunk floor and expose the two plastic rivets holding the battery cover in place. Remove the plastic rivets with a straight head screwdriver.



Step 30: Place a small 10mm open end wrench over the nut holding down the negative terminal cable. Twist off and bag the nut. Gently pull up on the negative terminal cable to remove it. Push the terminal cable down and to the side of the battery. Do not let the two terminals touch (positive and negative).



Placing the negative terminal cable down and to the side of the battery.



Step 31: Locate and remove the positive terminal cable in the engine bay. It is a small black box with a release clip above the strut tower in front of the DSC module bin. Pop the clip and flip back the cover. There is a large nut holding down the positive terminal cable. Using a 19mm socket and wrench, remove the nut and bag it. Pull the cable off of the threaded stud and place aside in the engine bay. Be sure to note mentally where you place it.



Step 32: Remove the oil filler cap on top of the engine cover.



Step 33: Locate the six chrome nuts that hold the engine cover in place. Using a 10mm deep well hex socket and wrench, remove them. I've circled them in red.



The sixth nut is in the lower corner of the VANOS area. Removing the engine shroud in the previous steps will expose it and provide more space to work.



Step 34: Pull up on the engine cover after removing the 6 nuts and remove it. Carefully place engine cover out of the way where it won't get stepped on.



This is how the engine should look now. You are now looking at the top of the valve cover where the ignition coils sit.



Step 35: Be sure to replace the oil filler cap to prevent dust and contaminants from getting into the engine as well as the black vent hose.



Step 36: The black plastic wire harness on the low side of the valve cover has two release clips. Simply pinch them together and pull the harness up slightly. Pull up and slide the harness down a little ways towards the side of engine block (nearest headers) to provide more space to reach the ignition coil connections. Don't push the harness too far as this will put stress on the cables clamped to the harness. I've circled the clips in red.



Step 37: Locate the first ignition coil for the first cylinder. There is a release clip on the head of the coil. Flip this clip up. When the clip is flipped, you'll notice the cable pushes slightly outward for easier removal.



Step 38: Gripping the head of the ignition cable with one hand and holding the top of the ignition cable still with the other, gently pull the cable out of the ignition coil.



Step 39: Notice the hole in the ignition coil clip. This is used for removal of the ignition coil. You can use your finger to try and pull the coil out, but I found it easier to use a screwdriver to pull it out. Insert the screwdriver through one side of the coil and grip both sides of the screwdriver with your hands. Pull straight up on the coil. Set the coil aside.



Here is the ignition coil removed.



Step 40: Now that the first ignition coil is removed, the process is the same for the remaining coils. Run down the cylinder line and flip the clips on the ignition coil heads. Then repeat the previous step and remove each ignition coil. There are 6 total.



All six ignition coils removed.



The valve train cover should look like this now after the coils have been removed.



Step 41: Locate the 6 spark plugs at the bottom of the ignition coil cylinders. Using the 5/8" deep well socket, 3/8" ratchet extension, and 3/8" ratchet, loosen each spark plug one at a time. Be sure the socket slips completely over the spark plug to prevent stripping of the head. It will take some force to break the spark plugs loose.



A spark plug located at the bottom of an ignition coil cylinder.



Inserting ratchet and socket over the spark plug.



A closer view of the socket in the cylinder.



Step 42: Use the telescopic magnet stick to remove each spark plug from the cylinders.



All 6 spark plugs layed out with cylinders 1-6 corresponding left to right.



The cylinders are completely empty. This is a chance to clean out any oil or contaminants that may be in the cylinders.



Clean cylinder.



Step 43: Chock the rear wheels and loosen the front wheel lug bolts.





Step 44: Safely jack the car up and have it supported by jack stands. I recommend the safe highest extension the jack stands can support. If you have a lift, this shouldn't be an issue. Don't ever substitute jack stands or a lift with anything else to support the weight of the car. Two jacks come in handy here. I used four jack stands for support (mainly for peach of mind).









Step 45: Remove both front wheels.



Step 46: Install engine support brace. Position the legs of the brace along the sides of the engine bay. Place the hook through the eyelet above the water pump and tighten down. Wrap the chain through the eyelet and back up around the brace. I locked the chain together with a bolt. Disregard the valve cover being removed in my pictures. I removed it to replace the valve cover gasket.





I attached a second chain for peace of mind (not necessary).



Step 47: Remove the black plastic splash guard underneath the car. Use an 8mm hex socket to remove all 7 screws.

Step 48: Drain the engine oil. Use a 6mm hex bit socket to remove the oil drain plug.





Step 49: Remove the aluminum reinforcement plate. Use a 16mm hex socket to remove all 12 bolts. Depending on available space and angle, a socket extension may be required.



Step 50: Disconnect Xenon level sensor from passenger side front control arm.





Step 51: There are several methods here for dropping the front suspension and subframe. I chose the route that would allow me to keep the spindles, rotors, and calipers attached to the front struts so I could replace the worn out front suspension components. You are free to deviate as you please with disassembly of the front end. The common alternative method is to disconnect the spindles from the front struts and drop the entire subframe assembly together (subframe, front control arms, tie rods, power steering rack, rotors, and front control arm brackets) as seen in the picture below. The brake calipers are tied off to the front struts to prevent damage to the brake lines.

Photo cred mdavidm3



If you prefer to replace the suspension components continue along with proceeding steps for disassembly. Disconnect the end links from the sway bar using a 13mm open end wrench to hold the threaded section still while using a 14mm hex socket to loosen the lock nuts.



Step 52: Remove the 2 sway bar brackets. They are held in place by 4 nuts. Use a 13mm deep well socket. Be cautious here as the sway bar will drop once the bracket nuts are removed. If the bar doesn't drop on it's own, gently pull down on the center of the bar.





Step 53: Remove the lock nuts from the top of the outer tie rod ball joints. Use a 19mm hex socket.



Step 54: Remove the lock nuts from the top of the front control arms to spindles. Use an 18mm open end or ratchet wrench.





Step 55: Use a ball joint separator to pop the tie rod and front control arm ball joints from the spindles. Ensure that none of your body parts are directly below the tie rods and front control arms.









Step 56: Remove the front control arm brackets from the frame rails. There are 2 bolts per side (4 bolts total). Use a 16mm hex socket. BMW recommends always replacing these bolts since they stretch.



Step 57: Remove the power steering hose banjo bolts. Caution: power steering fluid will drain out. Use a drain pan or other container to catch the fluid. There are 3 bolts total. 2 are located on the steering rack itself. The third banjo bolt is near the base of the power steering pump. If you trace along the high pressure hose, you'll be able to source them. Remove the smaller banjo bolt using a 19mm hex socket. Remove the two large banjo bolts using a 22mm hex socket. Now is a good time to replace or rebuild the high pressure power steering line.





Banjo bolts loosened







Step 58: Unbolt the steering column coupler from the steering column. You may need to turn the steering wheel so that the top bolt is accessible. Use an E10 external torx socket and extensions as necessary to remove the bolt.







Optional: you can further turn the wheel to access the bottom bolt if you plan on replacing the coupler.



Slide the steering column out of the coupler and push it up towards the direction of the steering wheel. It's telescoping so it should compress.

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Last edited by bimmerfan08; Fri, Dec-30-2016 at 04:15:36 PM.
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Old Sun, Oct-30-2016, 01:46:14 AM   #2
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Default Re: DIY: E46 M3 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment

Step 59: Unbolt the steering rack from the front subframe. There are 2 bolts that protrude all the way through the subframe. Use a 15mm hex socket on the bolt heads and a 16mm open end wrench on the nuts on top of the subframe. Spacing is tight so you'll have to feel around a bit until you lock on with the wrench.





Photo cred SYT-Shadow



Power steering rack fully removed from car.





Step 60: Unclip and remove the Xenon level sensor from the front subframe. There is one 10mm nut on the underside of the sensor holding it in place. Use a 10mm hex socket to remove the nut. Set the sensor aside to prevent damage. I ended up adding new paint to my subframe which is why I removed the sensor.





Step 61: Remove the hex nuts on the bottom side of the engine mounts. Use a 16mm hex socket and extension.



Step 62: Position a jack (transmission jack works great if you have one) beneath the subframe. If using a standard jack, a piece of 2x4 or 2x6 helps distribute the load over a wider surface area.



Step 63: Remove the 4 bolts securing the subframe to the frame rails. There are 2 on each side. Use an 18mm hex socket. I used an impact wrench to back them out. Inspect the bolt threads for damage and clean off any rust with brake parts cleaner.





Step 64: Slowly lower the jack and slide the subframe out from underneath the car. Ensure it doesn't get hung up on anything.



Step 65: This step is optional. Only perform if you want to replace the front control arms or have the front subframe repainted/touched up. My control arms were due so I opted to swap them out. Use a 21mm hex socket to remove the lock nuts. If the ball joint studs start to rotate while installing the lock nuts, you can can keep the studs from rotating by sticking a 5mm hex bit socket or allen key in the top of the studs and using a 21mm open end wrench, remove the nuts. Alternatively you can use a reinforcement plate bolt (16mm hex head) screwed into the bottom of the ball joint to keep it from rotating.





The oil pan should be easily accessible at this point. There are a few more bolts and parts that need to be removed in order to drop the oil pan though.



Step 66: Relieve the tension on the main drive belt. Locate the tensioner pully center bolt. Use an 8mm hex bit socket to relieve the tension by turning the ratchet clockwise. Remove the drive belt once it goes slack.







Step 67: Remove the two bolts securing the bracket on the backside of the power steering pump pulley. The smaller bolt going through the center of the oil lines is 10mm. The larger bolt secured to the oil pan is 13mm.



Step 68: Remove the two long bolts securing the power steering pump. They are located just above the power steering pump pulley. Use a 13mm hex socket and extension to remove them. Use metal wire or an elastic cord to suspend the power steering pump. Do not let it hang by the power steering hoses.







Step 69: Remove the 3 torx bolts that connect the transmission to the oil pan. If your face was level with the transmission, these bolts would be at about 5, 6, and 9 o'clock. Use an E11 external torx socket and a 3/8" breaker bar to loosen them. Then remove with a 3/8" ratchet.









Step 70: Remove the two oil pan bolts inside transmission mounting. Use a 10mm hex socket and a socket extension to reach them.



Step 71: Remove oil pan cover. Use a 10mm hex socket to remove all 6 bolts.



Ensure that you are properly segregating and labeling the hardware you remove so you don't end up with lost hardware during the reinstallation of parts. I chose to use a piece of corrugated with blocks drawn out for each piece of hardware. This was placed off to the side of my garage to avoid being bumped.



Step 72: Disconnect the oil return line that connects to the oil pan. For reference, this line extends all the way up to the valve cover. It's the banjo end you need to remove in order to remove the valve cover. On earlier S54s, the line has a rubber section that has a screw style hose clamp. Later S54s have a stainless steel braided section with a swivel adapter. The screw style hose clamp uses a straight head screwdriver. The swivel adapter uses an 18mm open end wrench to remove. I chose to upgrade my hose to incorporate a stainless steel section with swivel adapter. This is optional but I'll explain the process in the proceeding step.





Step 73: Again this next step is optional. To remove the early style oil line, you'll need to remove the 2 bolts securing the line to the side of the block. Use a 10mm open end or ratchet wrench to remove them. Remove the banjo bolt at the top of the line too. Use a 17mm hex socket to remove the bolt. You'll need to replace the 2 banjo bolt gasket rings (PN: 07119963129) to avoid any oil leaks. I bought an updated OE line (PN: 11157832781) originally thinking I was going to install it. I opted instead to have my original line modified by using the updated OE line as a template. The interior tubing of the updated OE hose is Teflon. A local hose shop was able to perform this service for me. You'll need to remove the original fitting in the oil pan using a 17mm deep well hex socket and replace it with an AN to Metric adapter fitting (-6 AN to 12mm x 1.5) using a 19mm hex deep well socket. Hacksaw also did this conversion if you need to reference his post: http://www.m3forum.net/m3forum/showp...postcount=5631.



Original line vs updated OE line. The original line is steel while the updated OE line is aluminum.



Having the original line modified took a few days so you can proceed with the DIY while you wait or install the updated OE line before proceeding.



Removing the old fitting and replacing with the new fitting. A new gasket ring is needed (PN: 07119963129). Only hand-tighten the new fitting. You do not want to strip the threads in the pan.









Reinstalling the banjo bolt. Use a 17mm hex socket and torque to 25 Nm or 18.4 ft-lbs.



Step 74: Disconnect the oil level sensor harness at the back corner of the oil pan.



Step 75: Remove the oil level sensor tubing from the 2 clips on the oil pan.





Step 76: Disconnect the oil vent hose from the top of the oil pan. Push in the two clips to release it. Photo cred SYT_Shadow



Step 77: Remove the dipstick tube from the oil pan. At the base of the tube is a nut that needs to be removed to release the bracket securing the tube. Use a 10mm open end wrench to remove it. At the top of the dipstick tube is a cap nut securing the tube. Remove the nut using a 10mm hex socket.





Step 78: Check around the oil pan to make sure nothing is still attached to it. Remove all 25 bolts securing the oil pan to the block. There are 3 different sized oil pan bolts so note which bolts go where. 20 of the bolts are M6x20. 3 of the bolts are M6x25 (near the oil vent hose). 2 of the bolts are M6x95 (in the back corners of the oil pan). I used the new oil pan gasket to layout where each bolt is located. Use a 9mm hex socket to remove the bolts.



Oil pan removed.



Found the sheared exhaust hub tab in the bottom of the oil pan. For peace of mind, I found that the tab had sheared off the exhaust hub when I performed a valve adjustment around 125k miles. I decided that the tab was already in the bottom of the pan and there was little chance it would do any harm at that point. So I let it remain there until I got around to dropping the oil pan to knock out the rod bearings at 160k miles.





If you look up at the engine, you'll now see the crankshaft and connecting rods.





Remove the oil pan gasket from the block if it didn't come off with the oil pan.



Step 79: Remove the oil pump return and suction pipes. There are two bolts bolts securing them to the brackets on the main bearing caps. Use a 10mm hex socket to remove the bolts. There are also 2 filister head screws securing the return pipe flange to the oil pump. Use a 4mm hex bit socket to remove them.







Pipes removed.



This is optional and personal preference but I chose to have the oil pan, valve cover, oil pump pipes, and oil filter cover hot tanked at my local machine shop to remove the discoloration and crud. It was $50 for this service and took about 2 hours.









Step 80: Inspect the oil pump screen to ensure it's not torn or has large holes in it. Use a finger to push the oil chain tensioner out of the way while removing the oil sprocket nut. Use a 17mm hex socket to remove the nut. It's reverse threaded so ratchet the wrench clockwise to loosen the nut.







Nut removed.



Step 81: Gently remove the oil chain sprocket from the oil pump shaft by pulling directly outward. You may need to work the chain off the teeth of the sprocket.



Sprocket removed.



Step 82: Locate and remove the 3 allen head bolts securing the oil pump to the block. Use a 6mm hex bit socket to remove them. Cradle the oil pump while removing the last bolt to prevent it from freely falling.







Oil pump removed from the engine.





You can elect to check for play in the oil pump shaft and open up the pump to inspect the internals for any damage/excess play. There are 4 bolts with 10mm hex heads securing the pump closed.



Step 83: Ensure the transmission is popped into neutral. Locate the crankshaft pulley bolt. It's either going to require a 32mm hex socket or on earlier models, a special BMW crankshaft torx socket (PN: 83300491056). The crankshaft torx socket can be substituted with a 36mm 12-point socket. Determine which socket your car will need and affix it to a 1/2" ratchet. Place the socket over the bolt head and rotate the crankshaft until cylinders 1 and 6 are at the furthermost point of their travel downward (should be extending towards your face).





Socket affixed to ratchet over crankshaft pulley bolt head.



Step 84: Cylinder 1 is ready for a new connecting rod bearing. Note that the rod bolts in my engine are M11 bolts with 12 points. The M10 bolts in later S54s have torx heads. Remove the connecting rod bolts from the cylinder 1 rod cap. Use a 12mm, 12 point socket for M11 bolts and an E12 external torx socket for M10 bolts. Important note that must be followed if reusing M11 bolts: the bolts must go back into the same order they were removed. I.e. exhaust side bolt must be reinstalled on the exhaust side again. My bolts and rod caps were previously marked during the rod bearing service campaign as demonstrated by the yellow dots in the picture. I still ended up marking the bolt heads either "E" for exhaust or "I" for intake with a silver marker to designate which side I removed them from.





The rods were forged and then cracked creating an uneven split in the connecting rod. These means that the mating surfaces between the cap and rod will only mate if properly aligned as removed. The easy way of noting the orientation without having to mark the cap and rod (you can if you want too) is to note that the serial numbers are engraved on the exhaust side of the connecting rod.



Rod bolts removed. The rod cap is not going to freely fall. Use a dead blow hammer to gently tap the rod cap loose.



Rod cap removed. The bearing journal is now exposed.



Bearing shell in rod cap. You can remove it by pushing it sideways until it slides out of the cap. Not difficult to figure out.



Step 85: Cut out a clean and fiber-free strip of corrugated approx 150mm x 20mm.



Step 86: Push the rod up and away from the crank. Ensure there is enough clearance so that the rod does not contact the crankshaft. Be mindful of the oil spray nozzles too. Slip a piece of corrugated over the crank journal to prevent damage from the rod. You may want to wear a protective glove when pushing the rods up. I managed to cut my thumb on the rod end.





Step 87: Carefully pull the rod back down and to the side of the crank journal to retrieve the rod shell. Again, work the shell sideways to slide it out of the rod.



Step 88: After removing the bearing shell from the rod, clean the bearing surface with a fiber-free cloth. Install a blue marked bearing shell (PN: 11247835440) into the rod. It's easiest to align the grooved section of the bearing shell with the slot in the rod first and then push the other side down with your fingers. It may take some force, but take your time to prevent damage to the bearing shell. Using SYT_Shadow's term, the bearing shells are poka-yoke and are meant to be installed in only one orientation. Coat the bearing shell surface with assembly lube or clean engine oil (whatever oil you use in your S54). Carefully push the rod back up and over the crankshaft journal. Remove the piece of corrugated and slide the rod back down over the journal.



Blue marked bearing shell indicating it's rod side.





Step 89: Clean the bearing surface of the rod cap with a fiber-free cloth. Install a red marked bearing shell (PN: 11247835439) into the rod cap. Use the same method to install the bearing shell as you did the rod bearing shell. Clean the bearing shell then coat with assembly lube or engine oil. You can use a piece of corrugated board or paper to layout the used rod bearings and maintain orientation to inspect wear.









Step 90: This step is critical and must be followed according to procedure to prevent damage to the engine. Reinstall the rod cap and finger screw the rod bolts until they set. The torquing sequence differs depending on which rod bolt your S54 uses. Earlier S54s (before 12/12/2002) with M11 bolts have a much simpler torquing sequence while later S54s have a more complex torquing sequence. If you have a later S54 with M10 rod bolts, you may want to buy extra rod bolts in the event you mess up the torquing sequence. M10 bolts are TTY and fasten the rod cap to the rod by stretching so they can only be used once. When angle torquing, do not use a torque wrench. Use a 1/2" drive breaker bar with the torque angle gauge.

If you need more information about how to use a torque angle gauge you can watch the video below or research and read before proceeding.


Rod bolts screwed in finger tight. During the torquing sequence, alternate between the two rod bolts to apply even pressure. For example: settle torque the exhaust side rod bolt to 5 Nm then settle torque the intake side rod bolt to 5 Nm before proceeding to the next step in the torquing sequence.



S54s with M11 x 1.25 rod bolts:
1.) Settling torque: 5 Nm
2.) Initial torque: 30 Nm
3.) Angle torque to 70 degrees in a single stroke - important that this happens in a single stroke. If it doesn't, remove the rod bolts and repeat the torquing sequence.

S54s with M10 x 1.25 rod bolts:
1.) Settling torque: 5 Nm
2.) Initial torque: 30 Nm
3.) Angle torque to 105 degrees in a single stroke - important that this happens in a single stroke.
4.) Release the torque by backing off the rod bolt by approx one turn (360 degrees) and then retighten. Repeat the torquing sequence.
5.) Settling torque: 5 Nm
6.) Initial torque: 30 Nm
7.) Angle torque to 105 degrees in a single stroke - important that this happens in a single stroke.
8.) Release the torque by backing off the rod bolt by approx one turn (360 degrees) and then retighten. Repeat the the torquing sequence.
9.) Settling torque: 5 Nm
10.) Initial torque: 30 Nm
11.) Angle torque to 105 degrees in a single stroke - important that this happens in a single stroke. Don't release the bolt after this step. It is properly torqued and seated in the connecting rod.

Settling torque on the rod bolts. The settling torque is a very low torque value to properly align and mate the rod surfaces between the rod cap and connecting rod.



Before angle torquing, the torque angle gauge arm or magnet or clip needs to be at a point of origin that will not move to allow proper rotation of the gauge from that point. Orient the dial of the gauge so that the needle is at 0 degrees. This will make it easier to turn clockwise and arrive at the final degree value. Check for clearance to ensure nothing is going to obstruct your travel as you complete your strokes. While doing cylinder 1, the oil cooler may need to be removed, relocated, and suspended to allow more space. My S54 has M11 bolts so my torque angle gauge reads 70 degrees.



Step 91: Repeat the rod bearing replacement same procedure for cylinder 6. Once cylinder 6 is completed, rotate the crankshaft clockwise until the next two cylinders are at the furthermost point of their travel downward - should be cylinders 3 and 4. Cylinders 2 and 5 are last. Pictures below are from cylinder 6.









All 6 rod bearings replaced.



My rod bearings laid out. The bearings had about 125k miles on them. The cylinder 6 rod shell showed the most wear with copper partially exposed.









Step 92: This step is optional but if your engine mounts look compressed/worn or are higher mileage (over 100k miles), consider replacing them. The passenger side engine mount tends to exhibit the most deformation due to being close to the headers where a lot of heat is generated.



Use a 16mm hex socket to remove the hex nuts on top of each engine mount.



The passenger side engine mount has a small heat shield that slips over the top threaded stud.



My passenger side engine mount was compressed quite a bit. These were original engine mounts with 160k miles on them.





I wrapped the new engine mounts in aluminium foil. Not sure how much help it will provide to deflect some of the heat but I figured it couldn't hurt. Use new nuts and tighten with a 16mm hex socket. I'll discuss in a later step how I torqued the engine mount nuts. The engine mounts have 2 small dimples in the top of them. On the passenger side engine mount, the heat shield tab locks into either of these dimples.



Step 93: Reinstall the oil pump. The 3 allen bolts use a 6mm allen hex bit. Torque the bolts to 23 Nm or 17 ft-lbs.



Step 94: Reinstall the oil pump chain sprocket and nut. Use a small drop of Red Loctite threadlocker on the shaft threads. Torque the nut to 25 Nm or 18.4 ft-lbs.





Step 95: Reinstall the oil pump return and suction pipes. The 2 bolts that thread through the brackets use a 10mm hex socket. The two fillister screws that secure the flange of the oil pump suction pipe to the oil pump use a 4mm hex bit socket. Only hand tighten until snug. I tried to use a torque wrench set at a very low value (6 ft-lbs) and didn't hear the click. Ended up shearing one of the fillister head screws which had to be drilled out by my local machine shop.







Step 96: Ensure the block mating surface for the oil pan is clean and free of debris. I used a gasket scraper to lightly scrape off old gasket sealer.



Step 97: Optional but the oil level sensor can be replaced while the oil pan is removed. Remove the 3 bolts using a 10mm hex socket. Install a new oil level sensor (PN: 12617508003) and torque the 3 bolts to 9 Nm or 6.6 ft-lbs. The new oil level sensor includes a sealing gasket.



Step 98: Reinstall the oil pan drain plug using a 6mm hex bit socket. Use a new crush gasket that came in the oil filter kit. Torque to 25 Nm or 18.4 ft-lbs and no more. You do not want to strip the oil pan threads.



Step 99: Install a new a new oil dipstick o-ring (PN: 11431707164) into the oil pan.



Step 100: Reinstall the oil pan. Gasket sealer is really only needed in the corners of the oil pan but I chose to run a small bead around the entire perimeter of the mating surface. Line up the new oil pan gasket (PN: 11131437237) with the bolt holes. The 23 shorter oil pan bolts (8.8 grade) are torqued to 10 Nm or 7.4 ft-lbs. The 2 longer oil pan bolts (10.9 grade and at the back corners) are torqued to 12 Nm or 8.9 ft-lbs. Use a 9mm hex socket.



Ensuring that nothing is blocking the reinstallation of the oil pan.



Oil pan reinstalled.



Step 101: Reinstall the two oil pan bolts inside transmission mounting. Use a 10mm hex socket and a socket extension to reach them. Torque the bolts to 10 Nm or 7.4 ft-lbs.



Step 102: Reinstall the 3 torx bolts that connect the transmission to the oil pan. If your face was level with the transmission, these bolts would be at about 5, 6, and 9 o'clock. Use an E11 external torx socket. Torque the bolts to 30 Nm or 22 ft-lbs.





Step 103: Reconnect the oil return line that connects to the oil pan. On earlier S54s, the line has a rubber section that has a screw style hose clamp. Later S54s have a stainless steel braided section with a swivel adapter. The screw style hose clamp uses a straight head screwdriver. The swivel adapter uses an 18mm open end wrench.



The upgraded stainless steel braided oil return line.



Step 104: Reinstall the oil pan cover. I used a small bead of gasket sealer around the circumference of the hole (not necessary). Use a 10mm hex socket. Torque the 6 bolts to 9 Nm or 6.6 ft-lbs.





Step 105: Reinstall the oil dipstick tube into the oil pan. Hand tighten the nut on the bottom bracket and the cap nut at the top of the tube.





Step 106: Plug the oil level wire harness back into the sensor.



Step 107: Reconnect the oil vent hose to the oil pan.



Step 108: Reinstall the two long bolts securing the power steering pump. They are located just above the power steering pump pulley. Use a 13mm hex socket. Torque to 12 Nm or 16 ft-lbs.





Step 109: Reinstall the two bolts securing the bracket on the backside of the power steering pump pulley. The smaller bolt going through the center of the oil lines is 10mm and is torqued to 6 Nm or 4.4 ft-lbs. The larger bolt secured to the oil pan is 13mm. I only hand tightened both bolts.





Step 110: Locate the tensioner pully center bolt. Use an 8mm hex bit socket to relieve the tension by turning the ratchet clockwise. Reinstall the drive belt.









Step 111: Only perform this step if you removed the front control arms from the front subframe. Reinstall the front control arms (original or new). New lock nuts must be used. Use a 21mm hex socket to tighten the lock nuts. If the ball joint studs start to rotate while installing the lock nuts, you can can keep the studs from rotating by sticking a 5mm hex bit socket or allen key in the top of the studs and using a 21mm open end wrench, tighten down the nuts. The front control arms are different depending on the side: left (driver) front control arm (PN: 31122229453) and right (passenger) assembled tie rod (PN: 32112228786). Torque the lock nuts to 90 Nm or 66 ft-lbs.



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Last edited by bimmerfan08; Sun, Oct-30-2016 at 03:12:45 AM.
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Old Sun, Oct-30-2016, 01:47:02 AM   #3
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Default Re: DIY: E46 M3 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment

Step 112: Reinstall the front subframe. Center and balance the front subframe on a jack or transmission jack. If using a standard jack, a piece of 2x4 or 2x6 helps distribute the load over a wider surface area. Roll it underneath the car and raise the subframe. Align the engine mount studs to protrude through the subframe. Align the bolt holes in the subframe with the bolt holes in the frame rails. The small knobs on the subframe insert into the frame holes allowing for easier alignment.



Aligning knob on front subframe with bolt hole in frame rail.



Aligning engine mount studs. You may need to loosen the top hex nuts if the engine mounts won't rotate into place. Install new hex nuts on the bottom studs. Use a 16m hex socket. Torque both the bottom and top hex nuts to 45 Nm or 33 ft-lbs.





Step 113: Insert the 4 front subframe bolts. Use an 18mm hex socket to snug them up. Torque the bolts to 110 Nm or 81 ft-lbs.



All 4 bolts installed and jack removed.



Step 114: Install new front control arm brackets and bushings onto the front control arms if you elected to replace them. Reinstall the front control arm brackets to frame rails. Use 4 new hex bolts (PN: 33306760652). Torque the bolts to 59 Nm or 44 ft-lbs.



Step 115: Reinstall the Xenon level sensor if you removed it. The nut is a 10mm hex.



Step 116: This step is optional. Spray PB Blaster or some other penetrant on the power steering rack splines. Remove the steering shaft coupler by using a straight head screwdriver and hammer to tap the screwdriver gently. Replace with a new steering coupler (PN: 32301094703). Using an E10 external torx socket, thread a new torx bolt (PN: 32306778609) through the steering coupler to the power steering rack. The bolt threads should have Blue Loctite threadlocker on them. If they don't or you feel there's not enough, add a small drop of threadlocker to the threads. Torque the bolt to 22 Nm or 16 ft-lbs.



Old vs new.



Step 117: This step is optional and only necessary if you are replacing the tie rods. Remove the outer tie rods from the inner tie rods. My tie rods were seized so I had to cut the outers from the inners using an angle grinder. Wear proper eye protection when cutting metal. Remove the tie rod boots by cutting the hose clamps.





Outer tie rods removed.



Step 118: Reinstall the power steering rack back onto the front subframe. There are 2 bolts that protrude all the way through the subframe. Use a 15mm hex socket on the bolt heads and a 16mm open end wrench on the nuts on top of the subframe. Spacing is tight so you'll have to feel around a bit until you lock on with the wrench. Torque the bolts to 42 Nm or 31 ft-lbs.



Photo cred SYT-Shadow





Step 119: This step is optional and only necessary if replacing the tie rods (see step 117). I rented a tie rod tool kit from Advance Auto Parts. The 1-5/16" fitting worked well for the hex end on the inner tie rod. Remove the inner tie rods using the special tool. Install new inner tie rods using the tool. Torque the inner tie rods to 100 Nm (+ 10 Nm) or 74 ft-lbs (+ 7 ft-lbs). The tie rod assemblies are different (outers being different) depending on the side: right (passenger) assembled tie rod (PN: 32112228786) and left (driver) assembled tie rod (PN: 32112228785). Install the old tie rod boots if in good condition or install new tie rod boots (PN: 32131096910). Use jaw pincers or ear-type clamp pliers to secure new ear style clamps on the boots.





New inner tie rod installed.





Step 120: Reinstall the steering column coupler to the steering column. You may need to turn the steering wheel so that the top bolt is accessible. Ensure that that the steering column and steering rack are properly aligned. Use an E10 external torx socket and extensions as necessary to install new a torx bolt (PN: 32306778609). Torque the torx bolt to 22 Nm or 16 ft-lbs.









Step 121: Reinstall the power steering hose banjo bolts. There are 3 bolts total. 2 are located on the steering rack itself. The third banjo bolt is near the base of the power steering pump. Use new gasket rings. The smaller banjo bolt uses a 19mm hex socket and two gasket rings (PN: 32411093596). Torque the small banjo bolt to 35 Nm or 25.8 ft-lbs. The two larger banjo bolts use a 22mm hex socket and two gasket rings each (PN: 32411093597). Torque the large banjo bolts to 40 Nm or 29.5 ft-lbs.





Step 122: This step is optional and only necessary if you removed the front control arms from the spindles. Connect the outer front control arm ball joints to the spindles and thread on new lock nuts. Tighten the lock nuts down using an 18mm open end or ratchet wrench. Use a 5mm allen hex key inserted into the top of the ball joint studs to keep them from rotating. Once snug, torque the lock nuts to 65 Nm or 48 ft-lbs.



Step 123: This step is optional and only necessary if you removed the outer tie rods from the spindles. Connect the outer tie rod ball joints to the spindles and thread on new lock nuts. Tighten the lock nuts down using a 19mm hex socket. If the tie rod studs rotate, use a 5mm allen hex key inserted into the top of the ball joint studs to keep them from rotating and a 19mm open end wrench to tighten down the lock nuts. Once snug, torque the lock nuts to 65 Nm or 48 ft-lbs. Use a 24mm open end wrench to loosen the outer tie rod nut. Then loosen the locking collar by tapping it off the outer tie rod sleeve. Use a 13mm open end wrench on the inner tie rod shaft to adjust the toe. You can use a 20mm open end wrench on the outer tie rod sleeve to hold it steady. You'll want to get the toe as close as possible to what it was prior to removing the tie rods. Or at least suitable enough to drive to get an alignment performed - preferably zero toe. Spread a small bit of anti-seize on the tie rod threads.



Fully reassembled.



Step 124: Reinstall the reinforcement plate. Use new bolts (PN: 31106772199) and a 16mm hex socket. Torque the bolts to 59 Nm or 44 ft-lbs on the initial torque. Then angle torque each bolt 90 degrees using a breaker bar.



Step 125: Reinstall the sway bar. Refer back to steps 51 and 52.

Step 126: Remove the engine support brace.



Step 127: Reinstall the wheels and tighten the lug bolts until snug. Use a 17mm deep well hex socket.

Step 128: Use a jack to raise the car. Remove the jack stands. Use a helper jack to lower the car back to the ground. Torque the lug bolts to 120 Nm or 89 ft-lbs.



Step 129: Add 6.5 liters of fresh engine oil. Check the oil level using the dipstick.



Step 130: Check the power steering hydraulic fluid level using the dipstick. Add ATF fluid as necessary to be within the min and max line.



Step 131: Reinstall the spark plugs and ignition coils. Torque the spark plugs to 23 Nm (+/- 3 Nm) or 17 ft-lbs (+/- 2.2 ft-lbs). Use a 5/8" deep well hex socket (16mm deep well hex socket can be used too).





Step 132: Reinstall the negative terminal cable on the battery. Use a 10mm hex socket to secure the nut.



Step 133: Start the engine. Turn the steering wheel to full lock both ways to remove any air in the power steering system. Do this several times to ensure air is evacuated from the system. Recheck the power steering fluid level. Add more ATF fluid if necessary.

Step 134: Reinstall all other parts on the top end of the engine bay that were removed.









The BMW service bulletin recommends breaking in the new bearings for the first 1,200 miles by not exceeding 5,500 RPM or 105 MPH. The consensus on the forum is that the rod bearings do not require a break-in period since they are wearable part and don't have to be seated like piston rings. It's suggested to change the oil at a reduced interval considering the foreign debris and contaminants that would have gained access to the engine with it being open (assembly lube, dirt from fingers/tools, etc.).
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Last edited by bimmerfan08; Mon, Oct-31-2016 at 02:58:17 AM.
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Old Sun, Oct-30-2016, 02:11:37 AM   #4
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Default Re: DIY: E46 M3 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment

wow...awesome and detailed DIY guide!
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Old Sun, Oct-30-2016, 02:13:02 AM   #5
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Default Re: DIY: E46 M3 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment

You and shadow are my DIY heroes!
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Old Sun, Oct-30-2016, 02:14:56 AM   #6
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Default Re: DIY: E46 M3 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment

Epic DIY! I always appreciated the detail you put into these.
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Old Sun, Oct-30-2016, 02:22:31 AM   #7
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Default Re: DIY: E46 M3 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment

Quote:
Originally Posted by AfternoonShift View Post
wow...awesome and detailed DIY guide!
Thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by ThunderMoose View Post
You and shadow are my DIY heroes!
Taking a hiatus from compiling DIYs after this one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdavidm3 View Post
Epic DIY! I always appreciated the detail you put into these.
Thanks! And thanks for the photo. I couldn't find a good photo of the entire front subframe assembly dropped until you posted yours the other day.
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Old Sun, Oct-30-2016, 02:31:19 AM   #8
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Default Re: DIY: E46 M3 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment

Easily the most detailed diy I have ever seen.

Wouldn't be surprised if writing the diy took longer than doing the work.
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Old Sun, Oct-30-2016, 02:53:50 AM   #9
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Default Re: DIY: E46 M3 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment

Another quality DIY from bimmerfan08. I just documented my SMG swap with pics and boy is it a lot of work, doing all that and writing it up is seriously very time consuming so I give you a lot of thanks and credit for taking the time to do all this! This will help a lot of people out, excellent work!!
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Old Sun, Oct-30-2016, 03:06:57 AM   #10
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Default Re: DIY: E46 M3 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment

Wow. Best DIY ever. Thank you, you've inspired me to DIY this.
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Discussing DIY: E46 M3 detailed rod bearing replacement and front suspension refreshment in the E46 M3 (2001-2006) Forum - Engine: S54 - Max Hp: 333 hp at 7,900 rpm / 262 lb/ft at 4,900 rpm
Total Produced: 45,000+ - Years Produced: 2001 to 2006. at BMW M3 Forum.com (E30 M3 | E36 M3 | E46 M3 | E92 M3 | F80/X)