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View Full Version : What is the best way of cleaning engine bay?


advan24r
Tue, Apr-20-2004, 11:48:54 PM
So far, I've heard of using simple green. Foiling up all the electronic parts. I'm more worried about the DDEs that I have and washing it. Any other easier way of doing it?

BaDm0theR
Wed, Apr-21-2004, 05:16:45 AM
Simple green is indeed a widely used (and very efective cleaner/degreaser that can easily tackle tough jobs like engine detailing (this is actually the product i use too).

Here are some simple steps in which to follow when detailing an engine bay:
Please note, you can substitute & mix/match the products i list with whatever works best for you...i aim to advise, not advertise (unless thee companies compensate me with substantial monetary funds :D ).

1. Start with a cold engine (very important)

2. Spray down with water (you can use a light mist, dont drench it)

3. Spray with Simple Green (or similar cleaner/degreaser, if engine is new and desnt need much work then dilute the solution with water)

4. Scrub Simple Green with large tire brush (and/or smaller brushes as needed to get to tough spots)

5. Rinse (again with a light mist/shower stream...you dont need to use much water)

6. Spray again with Simple Green (or simiar product) in major problem areas

7. Clean these areas with various brushes depending on need

8. Rinse

9. Dry as much as your hands can reach (there are many small nooks and crannies, use cheaper terry cloth towels for this step too, nothing expensive)

10. Let sit for a few minutes (Basically make sure the water is 95% gone)

11. Spray with a gentle protectant/dressing (i use Poorboys natural look, its fantastic)

12. Rub the protectant/dressing in ( you only need a small/thin layer, then just buff off)

13. Let sit until dressing/protectant is dry

14. Touch up problem areas with appropraite product


Hope this helps, and goodluck!

Z rated
Wed, Apr-21-2004, 08:08:51 AM
Do i need to be worried about water getting in places they shouldnt be? If there is a need to cover areas up my fear is that i'll miss a spot and end up screwing up the electrical system

NRG
Wed, Apr-21-2004, 08:41:54 AM
Simple green is indeed a widely used (and very efective cleaner/degreaser that can easily tackle tough jobs like engine detailing (this is actually the product i use too).

Here are some simple steps in which to follow when detailing an engine bay:
Please note, you can substitute & mix/match the products i list with whatever works best for you...i aim to advise, not advertise (unless thee companies compensate me with substantial monetary funds :D ).

1. Start with a cold engine (very important)

2. Spray down with water (you can use a light mist, dont drench it)

3. Spray with Simple Green (or similar cleaner/degreaser, if engine is new and desnt need much work then dilute the solution with water)

4. Scrub Simple Green with large tire brush (and/or smaller brushes as needed to get to tough spots)

5. Rinse (again with a light mist/shower stream...you dont need to use much water)

6. Spray again with Simple Green (or simiar product) in major problem areas

7. Clean these areas with various brushes depending on need

8. Rinse

9. Dry as much as your hands can reach (there are many small nooks and crannies, use cheaper terry cloth towels for this step too, nothing expensive)

10. Let sit for a few minutes (Basically make sure the water is 95% gone)

11. Spray with a gentle protectant/dressing (i use Poorboys natural look, its fantastic)

12. Rub the protectant/dressing in ( you only need a small/thin layer, then just buff off)

13. Let sit until dressing/protectant is dry

14. Touch up problem areas with appropraite product


Hope this helps, and goodluck!

Thats some good 411 there. BTW I try to add toyour rep and still it says I must spread it around.

BaDm0theR
Wed, Apr-21-2004, 03:46:41 PM
NRG, spread it around, and then get back to me and show me some 'rep' lovein!

BaDm0theR
Wed, Apr-21-2004, 03:50:37 PM
Do i need to be worried about water getting in places they shouldnt be? If there is a need to cover areas up my fear is that i'll miss a spot and end up screwing up the electrical system


In my experience (having done numerous Beemers, Merc's and such), you don't necessarily have to cover up every single wire/plug in the engine bay. Beleive it or not, the majority of theelectrical conductive wires are already sealed in a sense, and the fact that you are simply misting the engine bay, not 'drenching' it singificantly redues the chances of a problem. In adition, all modern engine bay's are designed so that everything that couldn potentially be hazardous, or cause an electrical short is designed to be 'sealed off. You have little to worry about.

If you are still hesistant or concerned, then mist water onto a terry cloth towel and use that for the spots around various battery terminals, electrical ports and such.

Does that answer your question?

Sirius
Wed, Apr-21-2004, 04:42:25 PM
Well, at work, I either use spray-nine or an engine de-greeser to clean the engine bay. Then I just hose it off real quick. I have yet to have a single problem with this.

Just don't use direct pressure on anything, ie: Setting the hose to a heavy stream, fan it out so it gets the bay wet, but not directly putting force on anything. Let the engine drip dry for a few mins, then run it to have the heat dry it off. Use a chamois to get any excess water.

Cover any aftermarket air-filters too with a plastic bag or whatnot.

Mike, heres a question for you seeing how you're a detail man:
My steering wheel has all sorts of gunk on it. I tried spray nine, and that got some of it off, but just turned an entire white rag into a messy black rag... and left the wheel somewhat sticky... any suggestions on how I can clean that leather off without damaging it too much, or at all?

Z rated
Wed, Apr-21-2004, 09:26:26 PM
Yup thanks BaD

BaDm0theR
Wed, Apr-21-2004, 10:27:49 PM
Mike, heres a question for you seeing how you're a detail man:
My steering wheel has all sorts of gunk on it. I tried spray nine, and that got some of it off, but just turned an entire white rag into a messy black rag... and left the wheel somewhat sticky... any suggestions on how I can clean that leather off without damaging it too much, or at all?


Yes, leather steering wheels, and leather interiors for that matter (especially when not maintained on a regular basis) can build of a certain level of 'gunk' on them. This 'gunk' is a film dirt, oils, sweat, water and other nasty stuff that is introduced mainly by the persons hands (hehe, yea call me captina obvious...but some people are surpised when they're steering wheels are the dirtiest part of their interior).

There are numerous high-quality leather care products that you can use to help restore your steering wheel.

Here are some of my personal high-end favorites:
Four Star: Leather Cleaner & Conditioner (2 seperate bottles)
Lexol: Leather cleaner & Conditioner
Meguiars: Leather cleaner & conditioner

Start off with a clean foam pad, or terry cloth and apply a small amount of leather cleaner. Gentle scrubbing the steering wheel see how well its working and how much grime is actually getting removed. You may need to re-apply the leather cleaner 2 or 3 times and work on the steering wheel fo a few minutes. (try to avoid overdoing on the leather cleaning/conditioning product....it shouldnt be gloopy or runny, just sufficient enought to prep the leather surface).

After the cleaning portion, take another clean terry cloth and buff off any remaining residue from the leather cleaner before you actually start applying the conditioner.

After the leather cleaner, grab yet another *new* terry towel and/or applicator pad and proceed witht he same gentle application method (scrubbing more intensely if need be). Again, more than once application of the conditioner ma be needed to help restore the steering wheel.

Finish by buffing off with another clean terry cloth and voila.

You'll find the product i listed will work very efficiently in restoring your leather's origignal luster.



Let me know how it works :beer:

paul e
Sat, May-08-2004, 07:28:19 PM
>>1. Start with a cold engine (very important)<<

Is that to eliminate any possibility of cracking the engine block with a cold stream of water? Hmmmm. .. I just did mine yesterday, and like an idiot, I ignored this caveat. I was most interested in spraying under high pressure the water at dirty spots at the bottom of the engine bay, and the lower radiator hose, and various other oily hoses. The car drove fine when I was finished, so I guess i escaped a potentially disasterous outcome. Whew.. Do you know of anybody who has cracked their block this way?

NRG
Sat, May-08-2004, 09:29:15 PM
NRG, spread it around, and then get back to me and show me some 'rep' lovein!


Oh i have been spreading my seeds...err rep pointS. lol

Brent_Vino
Sun, May-09-2004, 02:33:56 AM
spraying simple green on a hot engine, or hot wheels, you will soon know why thats a bad idea... it omits a toxic gas.. you breathe that stuff in, and its lights out.

M34U2NV
Mon, May-10-2004, 06:02:28 PM
Simple green is indeed a widely used (and very efective cleaner/degreaser that can easily tackle tough jobs like engine detailing (this is actually the product i use too).

Here are some simple steps in which to follow when detailing an engine bay:
Please note, you can substitute & mix/match the products i list with whatever works best for you...i aim to advise, not advertise (unless thee companies compensate me with substantial monetary funds :D ).



Hey bad,

I heard that you should also start the car and let it idle after you've finished up with the rinse, and it helps the drying process? Is that true?

-Frank

BaDm0theR
Wed, May-12-2004, 04:08:09 AM
Hey bad,

I heard that you should also start the car and let it idle after you've finished up with the rinse, and it helps the drying process? Is that true?

-Frank


Hey Frank,

Some aspects of detailing (such as starting the car briefly after cleaning and lightly rinsing the engine bay) really boil down to personal preference.

Ill say this though. Whenever we want to dry something efficiently (i.e prevent water spots and mineralization/hardening of water) it is in our best interest to dry as THOROUGH and as QUICK as possible (with minmal usage of heat). Intense heat, or a really hot surface can evaporate water too quickly and too harshly, leaving behind all the micro-deposits to be caked onto the surface that the water was on. Effective drying is achieved best by hand with a decent towel (no need to use expensive MF's for engine bay's), or some people prefer compressed air and/or leaf blowers to really shake water loose from the hard to reach areas. Note: Paint surfaces ofcourse require higher quality, and more gentle towels, like Waffle weave/Micrifiber.

Anytime we try to speed dry something by means of intense heat, we run the risk of drying the water too hard, too fast...inevitably leaving water spots and/or caked on mineral deposits on the surface (be it on the paint, or the engine block).

Bottom Line / My advice: Try to get as much as physically possible by hand, or means of compressed air....trying to minimize the usage of extreme heat to remove water. Starting the car briefly can and does help loosen those last few gobs of water, but i wouldnt recomend using the engine heat as the ONLY means of drying.

Hehe, as always, i make my replies longer than they should....but i hope this answers your question.



:peace: