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View Full Version : How to apply touch-up paint?


achen
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 06:55:11 PM
I am goign to fix few scratches on my car, bought a pack of touch-up paint from BMW, there are two bottles in it.

What is the correct steps to apply this?

Tpb31
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 07:02:12 PM
Clean the area, get some super fine grit sand paper...800grit or higher...preferably higher. Sand the area, then clean it. Then repeat the process about 8 times

achen
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 07:05:11 PM
Clean the area, get some super fine grit sand paper...800grit or higher...preferably higher. Sand the area, then clean it. Then repeat the process about 8 times


When I sand the area, do I use the sand paper wet or dry?

After I sand it, clean it, repeat this couple times, what's the next step?

icode4food
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 07:09:29 PM
Some one suggested using Langka. Worth a shot to get rid of the clumpiness affect.
http://www.langka.com/newsite/index2.html

Tpb31
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 07:10:18 PM
yeah, my bad...sand it wet. Put a clear coat wax on it, and you should be done. I did this back in the day on my Jetta, and you could barely tell that anything had happened. Make sure that you aren't sanding too hard though, and repeat the process until you are satisfied

Cabby
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 07:17:12 PM
Found this old email, thought it would be useful stuff:

Items needed:
1. Needle or toothpick with tip "broken" off
2. Meguires Cleaner/Wax
3. Your favorite polish -- I use Zymol, other use Zaino, etc.
4. Clean Terry-cloth (100% cotton towel) - for taking off cleaner wax
5. Clean Normal 100% cotton towel (slightly damp) - for applying cleaner/wax
6. Patience

Now, out to the car:
1. Clean off the spot with alcohol. This removes all waxes. [optional]

2. Shake up your touch-up paint REAL WELL and Open container.

3. Take needle or toothpick and get some paint.

4. FILL the chip, gently moving the paint from egde-to-edge of the chip.

NOTE: At this point, pay close attention to see if you have filled the chip IN and that you have NOT overrun the edges onto the factory paint.

NOTE: Also, if you make a mistake... apply some Meguires and take the paint off. It should not be a problem.

NOTE: Make sure that the paint is not raised up in the middle. This is important as you'll see later you need to be able to knock the edges off.

5. Wait 5 mins or so and determine whether you need to roll your fingernail TOP over the chip to make it level with the surrounding paint -- this can happen if you put too much paint in the chip. At this point, you
can also GENTLY rub your finger across the paint to "move" it from edge to edge if you didn't get it the first time around. This also helps with smoothing the top.

NOTE: At this point, you MAY need to add more point INTO the chip to fill the hole to make it level with the surrounding paint. Once paint dries, it has a tendency to fall into the chip -- this is a dirt collector and can really be fixed later, if necessary by repeating Steps 1-5.

6. Wait about 5-10 more mins.

7. Once the paint is even, or darn close to it, take the Meguires Cleaner/Wax, apply some onto the normal damp towel (single, not folded), and rub it across the chip... you'll probably feel the uneveness of the chip through the towel.

8. With increasingly faster motion, and a little more pressure, keep rubbing the wax across the chip... you should feel the chip edges less and less.

9. STOP. Take this wax off with the terry towel.

10. Repeat Steps 7 thru 9 continuously, or until the touched-up place is smooth, while turning the towel to ensure no scratching of the paint occurs.

11. Apply Zymol or Zaino to the area waxed.

At this point, wait to dry completely, then apply clear polish (in your BMW paint kit) to chip. I haven't done this YET, so I'm not sure how this stuff
fits into my procedure. I'll let you know when I know more.

It has taken me about 5 years to figure this out...
and yes, it takes patience, but it works beautifully -- I have managed to perfect this to where it takes < 30 mins to do and you CANNOT see the chips unless you absolutely KNOW where to look... and then it takes
some work to see.

Let me know if you have any questions about this
procedure.

Tx.
- Speedi

achen
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 07:18:20 PM
yeah, my bad...sand it wet. Put a clear coat wax on it, and you should be done. I did this back in the day on my Jetta, and you could barely tell that anything had happened. Make sure that you aren't sanding too hard though, and repeat the process until you are satisfied

I'm so sorry that I have to make myself more clear, I don't want to mess up my bumper and make the scratches wrose..

Which one is the correct step?
(A)
- Sand it, clean it couple times
- Apply the touch-up paint
- Apply the clear coat

(B)
- Sand it, clean it couple times
- Apply the touch-up paint
- Sand it, clean it few more time
- Apply the clear coat

Two more questions:
(1) How to deal with the mark left by the brush? Or there will not be any?
(2) How large is the area I need to sand, according to the scratch?


icode4food, thank you for the suggestion but I have already bought the BMW touch-up paint just in order to match the color perfectly, I don't have chance to try that product even it's got good feedbacks. :)

icode4food
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 07:23:51 PM
icode4food, thank you for the suggestion but I have already bought the BMW touch-up paint just in order to match the color perfectly, I don't have chance to try that product even it's got good feedbacks. :)You use the langka in conjunction with the BMW touch up paint, or any touch up paint. Not by itself.

Rob's Archive
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 07:35:11 PM
i have got to save this cause i have 3 stone chips all the way down to the bare metal from the trip to mississippi

Tpb31
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 08:22:30 PM
step 1:clean the area
step 2:wet sand the area enough to make it smooth
step 3:clean and dry the area
step 4:apply paint
step 5:allow plenty of time for paint to dry
step 6:repeat steps 1-5 about 8 times
step 7:after the last coat use ultra fine grit paper 1600 sand softly(wet)
step 8:apply wax
step 9:smile at a job well done

Beowoulf
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 08:44:07 PM
I don't understand the reasoning behind the sanding. You only do this to scratches that can not be touched up. Wet sanding is not something you want to try without some experience and you are going to need a lot finer than 800 grit. It is more like 1000-2000. If you are suggesting sanding the edges slightly then that is ok but not the whole area.

My suggestions:

1. Clean area with alcohol to remove any wax and contaminants.
2. Remove any loose pieces of paint with very fine pick.
3. Apply touch up paint with very fine brush or tip of tooth pick.

If you did it perfectly then you are set but most of us can not so I got the Langka Blob eliminator. After drying just use as directed but on scratches I use it perpendicular to the scratch. Be careful with this stuff and let paint dry well, use the card they give you to have a flat surface and don't overdo it or you remove all your touch up paint. It doesn't damage your factory paint so no worries.

After you are satisfied, polish and wax as usual but wait a few weeks to a month to let paint cure.

If you want to be real picky then go to www.autopia-carcare.com

Tpb31
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 09:05:25 PM
you are right...to a certain extent. I should have asked what kind of scratch was being touched-up. When I did mine, I was driving my Jetta. I scratched the front of my car against a wall. I thought I could make the turn, but didn't, and had about a 3 square inch area on the corner of my bumper that was scratched. Since it was plastic on brick, it wasn't smooth either. So I needed the sandpaper for the whole area. I just assumed it was huge like mine...my bad. If it is just a scratch, follow directions as written above.

jerrygee
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 09:38:29 PM
I agree with Alex, I wouldn’t go sanding on my car. Instead of a toothpick I have had good luck with a match from a match book that contains 20 matches, not the wooden type. Just tear a match out and use the end opposite the one you light. Just clean the area to be painted to remove any wax. Rock chips touch up well, scratches are another story, I would leave them to a professional.

Grimm333
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 10:38:23 PM
I use a similar procedure to Cabby's and it works GREAT!!! :dance:

Beowoulf
Tue, Apr-06-2004, 11:49:18 PM
Jerry, with the langka I have had the best result on light scratches of up to 6+ inches. I just get the paint in and once dry I lightly buff with the blob remover at a 90 degree angle. I have better results with this than stone chips.

Ninja K
Wed, Apr-07-2004, 04:37:29 PM
Uh oh....can I use touch up paint without sanding any **** down, I clipped the side of my mirror when reversing out of the garage this afternoon. Wanker!

Tpb31
Wed, Apr-07-2004, 05:03:32 PM
depending on how smooth it is depends on if you will need to sand it or not

Ninja K
Wed, Apr-07-2004, 05:53:39 PM
Depends if the finish is smooth before or after applying the touch up paint?

Sirius
Wed, Apr-07-2004, 07:20:21 PM
Just remember, clearcoat is thinnest on edges/ridges of panals. Thats the easiest place to burn thru your clear.

Beowoulf
Thu, Apr-08-2004, 06:51:02 AM
Do not sand if at all possible. You are removing clearcoat.

Ninja K
Thu, Apr-08-2004, 12:46:25 PM
How would this work:

1)Clean downs urface using alchohol
2)Apply T-cut or turtle wax which removes a small layer of paint but spreads it across the area being worked on
3)apply touch up paint
4)wait for it to dry then t cut the area that's been touched up to smoothen it out
5)apply a layer a waxes etc
6)wash down

How would that work?

Beowoulf
Sat, Apr-10-2004, 04:36:41 PM
I'm not familiar with T-cut but it sounds like an abrasive material. Abrasives are your last resort. Try the Langka if you want to even stuff out.

Ninja K
Sat, Apr-10-2004, 10:04:52 PM
I'm not familiar with T-cut but it sounds like an abrasive material. Abrasives are your last resort. Try the Langka if you want to even stuff out.
Yeah, it's rather abrasive stuff....I'l give that a miss...

How's about applying the touch up paint directly to a soft cloth then rub it into the scratches?

I want to avoid using a tooth pick, touch up paintbrush etc due to the bubbly service that's left over...

Beowoulf
Sun, Apr-11-2004, 09:57:50 AM
Yeah, it's rather abrasive stuff....I'l give that a miss...

How's about applying the touch up paint directly to a soft cloth then rub it into the scratches?

I want to avoid using a tooth pick, touch up paintbrush etc due to the bubbly service that's left over...

You will just end up with paint all over your clearcoat doing it that way. I'm telling you the Blob eliminator from Langka is made to remove the excess touch up paint. I just apply the paint without worrying about a little excess and then just remove the extra with the Langka. It is like $20 and doesn't hurt anything so give it a try.